Writing

How To Make Writing A Habit And Maintain It

I have many bad habits, but I also have a few good ones.

This is my advice for building a habit like writing and not breaking it three days in.

Be realistic.

Especially when you’re first starting out. You don’t want to set your sights so high that you have trouble reaching them. That can get discouraging real fast. Look at your life and lifestyle right now. How much time can you realistically commit to writing without letting other things slip or worse, suffer? It’s important you’re honest with yourself when making beginning a new habit.

Block out time.

Whether it’s ten minutes or two hours. Your creative time is sacred. Unless your house is burning down, don’t get up from your seat until you’re done.

Set goals.

Short and long term. Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly. Maybe you want to work for half an hour or perhaps write a thousand words. Besides, it isn’t as daunting to write 500 words every day as it is writing a 50,000 word novel. Having a clear idea of what you’re trying to accomplish ultimately gives you smaller benchmarks to hit with each writing session. At the very least, you’ll feel like you’re getting things done slowly but surely. It all adds up over the course of a year.

Track your habit.

There are a number of ways to do this. A notebook. An app on your phone. After a few days, you might feel less inclined to break your streak. Hopefully, you’ll push through and keep going even on days you don’t want to.

Hold yourself accountable.

Better yet find a friend to make sure you follow through with your habits and goals. Have someone check in often by asking you about your progress. You can always return the favour.

Use incentives.

Rewards are a great motivator when it comes to getting work done. Take advantage of the things that make you more willing to put pen to paper.

Have non-incentives.

On the other hand, you can have consequences when you procrastinate or make excuses. Monetary ones work well. Give your mom, sister, whoever five dollars every time you skip out on writing. Suddenly you aren’t as inclined to miss a session, huh?

Although I use writing as an example, the advice above can apply for almost any habit you’re trying to establish.

Good luck maintaining your habits!

14 thoughts on “How To Make Writing A Habit And Maintain It

  1. All sound advice, as usual. I blocked out Thursdays and Saturdays for myself to focus on my writing and novels and such. Yesterday, I had absolutely no idea what to work on. (Which meant that I just sat there looking at my to-do list.) So I gave myself deadlines and broke up what I want to work on for each month through May next year. It will obviously change depending on what I actually get done, but it helped get my thoughts organized.

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    1. That’s great. Yeah, you have to be your own boss. Sometimes I don’t know what I want to work on even though I have a dozen different things on my do list. It helps to have planning sessions, which is half the battle. The other half is following through with plans. Here’s to a productive rest of the year.

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      1. Exactly. And that’s been my problem lately is that I have too much to do/too much I want to do. I never know where to start. So the planning definitely helps.

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      2. Oh, for sure. My other problem is that I always work on things that have no deadlines when I should be working on other things first, lol.

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