20 Lessons I Learned As A Blogger


I'm nearly twenty years on this earth, and I've been blogging for over four.

So you're telling me I'm old and not afraid of commitment?

I don't believe it.

But I do believe being a blogger has taught me some valuable things.

  1. Love words, not numbers.
  2. Give back to the community.
  3. Always be yourself.
  4. Never stop learning.
  5. Do your best.
  6. Don't forget why you started.
  7. Create greatness.
  8. Keep it simple.
  9. Practice as often as possible.
  10. Push your perceived limits.
  11. Be your own boss.
  12. Listen to those who matter.
  13. Ignore the noise.
  14. Keep improving.
  15. Ask for help.
  16. Stay humble.
  17. Rise to the challenge.
  18. Chase what you want.
  19. Live life.
  20. Put your happiness first.

What have you learned from running a blog? I'd love to know down below. After all, sharing is caring.

How Being A Blogger Is Like Being A Baseball Player

The other day I had a brilliant idea wherein I change my brand to blogging about blogging using baseball analogies and similes.

I'm joking about the brilliant idea. I'm not joking about the baseball part. Which is why I'm presenting you with this probably bad, definitely weird post about what bloggers and baseball players have in common.

Long hours.

Weekends and holidays, what are those? These don't exist when you're a pro baseball player, and they certainly don't exist for bored teenagers who decided to start a blog with the goal of publishing one post once per day.

Thick skin.

Otherwise, you'll break like a breaking ball. Get it? Because breaking balls break. I'm so helpful. I know. My friends tell me that all the time.

Constantly thinking.

About blogging or baseball even when you aren't blogging or baseballing. Allow me to butcher words as I please.

Continually failing.

If you get a hit three out of the ten times you come to the plate, you're considered an above average hitter. So it's okay to fail more than you succeed. Now if only I could publish one half decent post for every hundred that I write. Then a certain girl might be able to blog about baseball for a living.

Messing up.

Even professional baseball players make errors. News flash: they're human beings too. Last I checked, so are bloggers. Everybody and their moms screw up, but there's no need to beat yourself up over a minor mistake.

Hard work.

They say baseball is a mental game. People have said that, right? I can't afford to pay anyone to fact-check my content. And I'm too lazy to do it myself. Blogging is very much a mental game, if not even more so than any sport. After all, bloggers don't actually have to move anything but their fingers.

I probably struck out on with this post. Next time I'll write a hit.

Doing Better Than Others Versus Doing Better Than Yourself

Although I was obsessed with doing better than others for one year too many, I'm more focused on myself now. I'd like to stay this way moving forward.

I remember a time when I looked at a blogger's stats (followers, views, etc.) and felt discouraged. Defeated even. I wanted to do better than others instead of trying to improve myself.

Even before I made this blog, I strived to beat out the students in my class. For a while, I stopped being concerned with my personal goals because I concentrated so much on the success of other people. Strangers, friends, acquaintances alike.

At some point, I realized doing better than others didn't make me happy. I shouldn't have cared how everyone else did in relation to myself.

So nearly twenty years after I came into this world, I've come to a few conclusions.

I have to define success on my own terms. I won't steal someone's definition and settle with it.

I want to do better than me, myself, and I. Which is why I need to strive to beat my personal best, not the best of another blogger or student.

After all, I'm on my own unique journey. And everyone else around me is on a different one of their own. It's unfair to compare.  

We're all human beings, but we aren't exactly the same. Like comparing apples to oranges. Both are fruits but apples aren't oranges. I'm not you. You are not me.

Besides, I'm happier when I focus on what I'm doing and how well I'm doing. Also, the time I spend asking a peer what they got on a test or peeking at a creator's numbers is better spent practicing my skills. I could be studying harder or blogging more to improve my abilities.

Interestingly enough, I constantly write in my journal that I can do better. One because it's true. And two because I want to. More than anything. I would love nothing more than to become a better writer and blogger. To grow as an artist.

Every day I should do something to ensure I'm moving forward rather than fall behind or stay stagnant.

Going forward, I hope I'll make a conscious effort to be better than I was yesterday.

My goal is to beat my own goals, best my personal records, not those of others.

Why I Procrastinate With Blogging

I used to put off blogging more than I did studying. I still do, though I’m not currently in school. But I’ve gotten better at not procrastinating as much.

But here’s the million dollar question: why do I procrastinate? 

To which I ask why do you procrastinate?

So my goal is to publish a post every day. I know that’s not everyone’s goal, but it’s mine. Maybe I’ll write about that one day. Not today.

My final deadline then is 11:59 PM every night. That’s a lot of hours from when I wake up (around 8 AM) to when I need to hit publish or schedule.

If I’m doing my math right, I have about 15.

My brain believes I have plenty of hours to blog then.

I like to think I’m good at managing my time. Still, I don’t feel any urgency to blog at 9 in the morning because 11:59:59 PM is so far away.

All the time time I perceive I have is part of why I put off blogging until late at night.

Another reason: perfection. I like to think I’m not that big of a perfectionist, but I am very peculiar with my blog posts.

I want my posts to be perfect or close to it. Sometimes I edit a draft, hate it, and can’t bring myself to publish the post. I dread this outcome so much. It feels awful to work hard on a project but despise the result.

I’ve experienced this more times than I care to remember.

Knowing my first draft will be anything but perfect makes me put off writing one. Let’s be honest, I’m also lazy too.

It should go without saying but I’m going to say this anyway, blogging requires more energy and concentration than watching TV for example. 

I also procrastinate because after several years, I have a better idea of how long I actually need to write and publish a post. So if I think I only need twenty minutes to edit a piece, twenty minutes is how much time I give myself.

Of course, life happens. And as much as we believe we only need a few minutes to accomplish a task, we’re sometimes wrong and need way more time.

The planning fallacy exists for a reason. 

I hope I’ve made some sense. In my head, I know exactly what I mean, but I don’t know if anything made sense or if everything got lost in translation.

In summary, I procrastinate blogging because of time, perfectionism, laziness, and a brain that thinks I need two seconds to write, edit, and publish a post.

How To Be A Happy Blogger

As if I know anything about that.

Blogging makes me happy. But sometimes it also drives me crazy.

You would think the longer you’ve been blogging, the easier and happier you’d be. I don’t know if I can agree.

The below is what I’d recommend bloggers do to stay happy or relatively so because everything is relative.

Have low expectations.

Or zero. Because disappointment is the bane of everyone’s existence.

Every time you expect something to happen, it probably doesn’t ever come to pass. Besides, if you don’t have expectations, anytime anything happens, you’ll be pleasantly surprised. Win.

Blog for yourself.

Blogging for others will never be as fun or as fulfilling. Please yourself, not others.

Make the conditions enjoyable.

Play music. Have a healthy snack nearby. Possibly a drink. Perhaps two. Coffee, water, your own tears.

Talk to bloggers.

Metaphorically, you’re not on an island. So reach out and enjoy the company of people with similar interests. Unless you want to be on an island by yourself with no human contact and communication.

Live your life.

As much as you might want to stay at home and never leave your room, leaving the house can help re-energize you. Which could, in turn, make you a better blogger.

You could write some of your best posts after a day out with friends or family.

Try new things.

Whether it’s related to blogging or not. The risk can lead to a worthy reward. You’ll never know if you don’t try.

Grow thick skin.

Failure. Negativity. Rejection. More like fun, novelty, and rejoicing.

Stay true to yourself.

If you don’t want to do something, don’t. 

Remember you’re good enough. You shouldn’t change who you are for the wrong reasons. 

Be kind.

To others and yourself. 

You’re likely your worst critic, but try to be your best cheerleader too.

It goes without saying, but I’ll say it anyway, I wish you all the happiness you can handle.

10 Skills Blogging Teaches You

Blogging teaches you many skills, including:

  1. How to grow thick skin like a lion.
  2. How to manage your time like a wizard.
  3. How to perform illusions like a magician. 
  4. How to pull off miracles like a miracle worker. 
  5. How to do surgery on a post like a surgeon.
  6. How to sell yourself like a marketer.
  7. How to fail 7 times out of 10 like a baseball player.
  8. How to spy on people like a ninja. 
  9. How to get very little sleep like a giraffe. 
  10. How to blog like a blogger.

My Writing Journey

I don’t remember the day I learned to pick up a pencil and put it to paper. Oh, how I wish I did. Being able to write changed my life.

I’m beyond grateful for getting an education. Because of it, I can read and write not just my name but also anything I want.

Before I fell for languages, English especially, I enjoyed and even excelled in mathematics. Mainly because it was so simple, straightforward. It was black and white. You were wrong or right.

Early on, I did better in math than in reading, writing, or oral communication. But throughout elementary, I must have read a boat load of books in my free time. Somewhere along the way my love for reading manifested into something more.

I went back to visit my elementary school teachers, and one of them still remembers how I used to write stories all the time. Although I don’t remember writing a lot as a kid, I recall reading anything in sight. 

In grade 8, I took on a full-length novel. Granted it took me about 2 years to finish the first draft because I took extended breaks along the way. But one of my proudest accomplishments to date is finishing that novel. It come out to 70,000+ words.

I started taking writing more seriously when I was in high school. Especially after I entered my first writing contest when I was in grade 9. I must have been about 13 years old, going on 14. 

I never thought twice about the contest until I heard back from them. Actually my English teacher got the news first because I put her name down and the high school I attended. So she pulled me aside during my math class. I thought I got in trouble. Little did I know my world was about to be rocked. 

She showed me the congratulatory letter with my name on it. I almost didn’t believe her. I never told my teacher that I had entered the contest. Come to think of it, I didn’t tell anyone.

Not only did I get the short piece published, I placed in the top ten of my age division, which happened to be the highest honour for that particular competition.

Later, I applied for my high school yearbook committee, specifically the journalism department. I got rejected. 

I think I owe that yearbook team a big thank you. Had it not been for them, I think I wouldn’t have started blogging, at least not as early as I did anyway.

Out of boredom, I created a blog in April 2013 at 15 years old. I guess I thought blogging would be the logical next step. 

I made it a habit to write every day in early 2015. Took me long enough.

I also got into journaling that same year on my birthday (August 22). I love having a place to write down my thoughts and feelings, worries and concerns. I know no one will read it. And so I can be brutally honest. 

I’m not sure when exactly I decided I wanted to be a writer. But I continue to hope I’ll be able to write for a living. I’d want nothing more.

In the past and even now, but more so back then, writing was my escape. I loved being able to get away from the real world that sucked at the best of times, and go somewhere else for a while.

At some point I loved stories so much I wanted to tell my own. I wanted to share my story. Which is why I write and blog and do what I do every day.

I think I love the freedom that comes with creating something from nothing. Writing is the one thing I have complete control over. I control what happens and when. I write on my own terms, not anyone else’s. 

In many ways, words changed my life for the better. I don’t know where I’d be or who I would’ve become had it not been for writing. 

Regardless of whether or not I become a published writer, I hope I never stop writing. On my own terms. To please myself. For my sake. Above all, I hope I write for the rest of my life because it makes me happy, happier than anything else in the world.

What I Learned After 4 Years Of Blogging

I started this blog over four years ago. Some days, it feels like I just started. Other times, I feel as if I’m going on forty years. 

And even though I still have plenty to learn, there’s a lot I know now that I didn’t before. I love that I’m learning something new every day.

Thanks to blogging, I have a better inderstanding of myself and what makes me tick.

When I first started, I wrote for myself. I created art for my own sake and sanity. So I continue to try to blog for myself. It’s more fun than blogging for other people. Trying to please everyone and their mother is impossible.

I think before I became a blogger, I didn’t trust myself enough. I relied on the judgement of those around me. Nowadays I’ve gotten better at trusting my gut, partly out of necessity. I didn’t have anyone to hold my hand throughout this insane journey. Anytime something came out of left field, I had to trust my instincts. Thankfully, it’s gotten me here today.

Blogging taught me to stick with my vision, even and especially when the going gets tough. As I grow older, I get more cynical. Yet I still dream. I envision a better, happier life. I know what I want to do, what I hope to accomplish. I also know I’d rather die taking risks and doing what I love than pass away playing it safe.

One of the toughest lessons for me has been coming to terms with the fact that I can’t control everything. I have to remind myself constantly to control what I can. More importantly, I tell my mind to let go of what I can’t.

These are just some of the things I’ve learned from blogging. I could go on and on and on and on. But I won’t because I want to know what blogging has taught you about yourself.

Answering Commonly Asked Questions About Blogging

Do I love asking myself questions and answering them in a blog post? Yes, I do.

Do you like these sort of posts? What’s that, you despise them…I don’t it’s possible to. 

What’s your favourite part about blogging?

I fell in love with words and stories before a lot of things in this life. And so being able to write blog posts is by far what I love best. I get to work with cool words and occasionally tell a bad story. As much as I enjoy everything that falls within the territory of blogging, I have the most fun creating something from nothing.

What’s your least favourite part?

I don’t have a good answer for this question. Even though I complain about the little things, blogging in general is great. That said, I do feel the slightest bit irritated when my eyes become tired after staring at a screen for a long period of time. I also dislike sitting down in a chair and living a sedentary lifestyle. However, if I worked on my laziness, I could fix the latter by blogging while standing up.

What are your blogging goals?

I want to blog for as long as possible. I want to write posts I’m proud of. And I want to learn as much as I can about blogging, so I can be a better blogger. Hold me accountable, people.

What did you expect when you first got into blogging?

I’ll tell you what I didn’t expect. I did not think I’d still be blogging four years later. I never thought having a blog would open so many doors for me. I haven’t exactly answered the initial question, have I? I guess I had no expectations going in. I went out on a limb, and started a blog without any ulterior motives. I didn’t obsess over making money. I didn’t care about fame. Besides I was a bored teenager who figured I might as well share my work with the world, even if no one is going to read what I have to say. 

What’s the best piece of advice you can give beginner bloggers?

Start. Start a blog. Start that blog post. Starting is usually the toughest part. Once you bring yourself to begin, good things will happen.

Where do you see your blog in ten years?

Still alive and well.

Here’s to reading all your blog posts several years from now. And here’s to hoping you’ll get to read mine.

Get To Know The Blogger

You get to know a certain blogger a little bit better.

Why did you start blogging?

Because the yearbook team at my high school rejected me. So I had a lot of free time after school. Lo and behold, one day I was bored and started a blog.

What do you blog about?

Anything and everything I want. Blogging is something I started doing for myself. And I don’t want that to ever change. I’m going to keep writing about the things I’m passionate about. The answer I usually give people when they ask is something along the lines of I blog about blogging and writing and reading. Boring, right?

When do you like to blog?

I tend to blog at night when my brain isn’t as critical and cynical. In the morning, I’m not the easiest person to be around to say the least. My inner critic rears her ugly head all the time. But she isn’t as annoying later in the day. I think she gets tired and heads to bed.

Where do you prefer to blog?

My bed. Somewhere comfortable is ideal. Unfortunately, I don’t live in a perfect world, so I can’t have the luxury of blogging in my pajamas all the time. Guess you really can’t have everything in life.

Why are you still blogging?

If I didn’t, I’d have a gaping hole in my heart.

How do you keep blogging?

I write. I edit drafts. I publish posts. All because I need my heart to be somewhat intact.

What’s your blogging routine like?

I think about blogging almost every hour of every day. On any given day, I probably blog for a lot less than sixty minutes. I just make myself type words. Delete them. Type more. Delete a little. And when I’m done, I publish the mess I’ve created for everyone to read. Not many people do.

Did you enjoy getting to know me a bit better as a blogger? Either way, I have more blogging questions I want to answer. Maybe I’ll get around to them some day.