Reading

5 Signs You’re A Book Blogger

Here are some signs you’re a full-fledged book blogger:

  1. You haven’t read that book someone gave you three years ago.
  2. Your to-be-read (TBR) list alone could sink a cruise ship.
  3. Reading slumps are your worst enemy.
  4. You can write a book review with your eyes closed.
  5. Your bank account is empty, but your bookshelves are full.
Reading

How Not To Request ARCs (Advanced Reader Copies)

How Not To Request ARCs (Advanced Reader Copies)

If you’ve ever wondered about requesting ARCs (advanced review copies), here’s how not to.

  • Email the wrong person/publisher.
  • Lie about your blog stats.
  • Mistype your contact information.
  • Draft an email only to delete it out of dread.
  • Request 1,048 books at once.
  • Clutter someone’s inbox with multiple emails.
  • Request ARCs for the wrong reasons.
  • Sell your soul to the devil.

Happy requesting, reading, and reviewing!

Blogging

10 Book Blogger Commandments

  1. Thou shalt read books thou wants to.
  2. Thou shalt write honest reviews.
  3. Thou shalt disclose the books thou received for free.
  4. Thou shalt respect bloggers.
  5. Thou shalt never sell ARCs.
  6. Thou shalt give thyself more credit.
  7. Thou shalt not steal the ideas of others.
  8. Thou shalt take care of thyself.
  9. Thou shalt live thy life.
  10. Thou shalt blog for thyself.
Blogging

What I’ve Learned From Blogging About Books

When I first started blogging in 2013, I didn’t blog about books. I wrote about writing and being a writer. But eventually I got into book blogging. And I’m so glad I did.

Here are some of the things I’ve learned:

Don’t be afraid to ask.

I was scared to request arcs for the longest time. I waited. I procrastinated. But one day, I asked. And I received.

It’s hard.

Being a book blogger isn’t easy. Unfortunately, words don’t write themselves.

You’re allowed to say no.

I can’t say yes to every novel under the sun. I only have 24 hours in the day just like everyone else.

Book bloggers are the best.

It’s a fact. I appreciate all of you.

Reading slumps happen.

Reviewing slumps do too. I remind myself that it’s not the end of the world. Take your time. Take a break if you have to. Then return when you’re ready.

Books are expensive.

I’m always here for supporting authors, even at the expense of my wallet. I’m also here for deals and sales, so I don’t find myself broke.

Reading

Confessions of a Book Reviewer

  • I don’t always remember to write a review after finishing the book. My memory isn’t what it used to be.
  • I copy the same template for all my reviews. My reviews would be a mess if I didn’t structure them.
  • I forget some details. Sometimes I’ve even looked up the protagonist’s first name.
  • I don’t take notes while I read. Maybe I should.
  • I love reviewing physical books. More often than not, they’re fiction. But hopefully one day, I’ll get around to reading more nonfiction.
  • I finish every book. I feel like it isn’t fair to the author or potential readers if I only read and review half the novel.
  • I use the same phrases in my reviews. There are only so many ways to say I recommend a book.
  • I don’t write in books. I can’t do it. At most, I’ll write on a sticky note to mark a specific passage or page.