Personal Reflection

Life Advice

You’ll figure it out. Adjust, adapt. Sometimes well-laid plans don’t pan out. That’s life. Do the best you can given the circumstances. Put your self in a position to succeed even if it seems the world wants to see you fail.

Don’t blame anyone, yourself included. If you want it badly enough, you’ll work for it. Work hard.

It’s okay to compromise. You may have to compensate. Make sacrifices.

You owe no one anything. Never ask for permission to do what you love. Never ask for approval once you’ve done what you love. This life is yours and no one else’s. Make your own decisions instead of letting someone else make them for you.

You’re going to regret what you didn’t do more than you’ll ever regret all the things you did. Believe in your abilities. You’re more than capable. You can do anything you set your mind to.

Some things don’t matter nearly as much as you think they do. Know who you are. You shouldn’t change for the sake of changing.

You can’t be perfect, so stop trying to be. Nobody else is. Aim for excellence. Do more than you have to. Dream big. Dream bigger. You’re too good to rest on your laurels.

Stay true to your word because that’s all you have. You will reap the seeds you’ve sown in due time. Have the patience to follow through with things to the end. You’re almost there.

Take care of your body. Listen to it. You deserve to be happy. Do what brings you the most happiness. Remember not to feel ashamed about living your life in a way that feels right.

Set the bar high enough that you challenge yourself but not too high that you put yourself in a corner. Nothing is worth more than your health, your well-being.

Go full out, not halfway. Remember all you’ve had to overcome to get here. Count your blessings, your lucky stars. Take pride in the progress you’ve made.

You’ll be okay.

Writing

10 Things Writers Do And Can Relate To

Writers do a lot of awesome things.

  1. Writers write. On the flip side, we also do everything we can to put off writing as long as possible.
  2. Writers get ink stains. On everything. No? Just me? I will hold my wallet up proudly for all to see and proclaim my status as a wordsmith. Or just a clumsy child who ruins everything she owns.
  3. Writers observe. Not to be confused with stalking. The two are not the same. Obviously, if you write, you would know.
  4. Writers talk to themselves. And to their dogs or cats if they have any.
  5. Writers make characters suffer. It’s part of our job to.
  6. Writers fail. All the time. If you haven’t failed and/or been rejected, who are you? You’re not human. At least, you haven’t taken great risks, lived your life.
  7. Writers drink. Coffee, tea, alcohol. We drink it all. We don’t discriminate.
  8. Writers read everything. Other people’s books, our own stories. We read a lot of words.
  9. Writers play with pens. Click. Click. Click.
  10. Writers dream and daydream. Then we dream some more.

Which of these can you relate to?

Reading

Plan Your Perfect Author Panel

Not long ago, I watched an author panel about genre blending. It got me thinking how awesome it’d be if I could gather all my favourite authors in the same room and listen to them talk about writing.

Here’s how I imagine my perfect panel:

Who would be there?

Pierce Brown, Stephen King, Sarah J. Maas, and Jodi Picoult. They’re my favourite storytellers as of right now.

Why these authors in particular?

In general, I love all of their work.

I enjoyed Brown’s Red Rising series, even though it shattered my already broken heart. So now I’m eagerly awaiting Iron Gold. In fact, IG is the first book I ever preordered. Also, Brown was in the genre blending panel, and his comments were spot on. The video is on YouTube for anyone interested.

King is king. I’ve said it before. I’ll say it again. This won’t be the last time, my friends. For some reason, I have this irrational fear I won’t like one of his novels. He still continues to surpass any and all expectations of mine. Carrie has a special place in my heart. The film adaption was not as good as the book but it wasn’t bad either.

I didn’t think I would like Throne of Glass by Maas as much as I did. The hype surrounding the books almost made me pass on it. I’m glad I didn’t.

Fortunately, I found and fell in love with House Rules. Then I proceeded to read all the Picoult novels I could get my hands on. Nineteen Minutes and The Pact stand out in my memory still to this day.

What will the panel be about?

To start, I’d want them to talk about their writing journey.

I even have questions prepared. When did you start writing? What made you become a writer? Why do you write? What’s a typical day in your life like? Where do you work? How do you write? What’s the easiest thing about your job? What is the hardest?

I’m a curious writer myself, so I like listening to other writers share their life stories.

Of course, if I could only ask one question, I’d have them answer this: what’s one piece of advice you’d give to aspiring writers?

Where would the panel take place? 

I wish more book events and conferences were held in the wonderful country of Canada. As much as I love the United States and hope to visit the United Kingdom one day, I can’t book a plane ticket without losing an arm or a leg. Probably both.

So, for obvious reasons, I’d want the panel to be held at a location near me. That way I could actually attend and keep all my limbs. In my dreams, I want to go to a Canadian book conference. Preferably downtown Toronto in a large building with awesome views of the skyline. Bonus points if it’s close to a hotel for those flying in from other countries with their two arms and legs.

When would the panel take place?

A weekend in the summer would be ideal. Or during autumn when the temperature is cool but not chilly. Then again, the panel will be inside an air conditioned room. But I’m all for having fun events take place outdoors. Beggars can’t be choosers, but planners can be picky, right?

Who should moderate?

I’m not sure. Perhaps another writer. Maybe an agent or an editor. I don’t have anyone specific in mind.

I want to hear all about your dream author panel. Let me know in a comment down below or create your own blog post and get carried away like me. I won’t judge.

Thanks to Eventbrite for inspiring this post. They are a self-service ticketing platform that helps people find and plan events like book conferences or author panels.

This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase through them, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

Reading

Describe Your Dream Library And Reading Space

Growing up, I fell in love with every aspect of interior design. Before I wanted to be a writer, I wished to work in real estate, preferably as a designer or stager of homes. So I couldn’t wait to buy my own house and decorate it however I wanted. I knew my dream home would include a library or some sort of reading space. More importantly, I would design that room to represent who I am, so it could serve as the perfect place to read and escape from the real world.

Recently, I was inspired by Arhaus to create a post showing my dream reading space and library. They design home furnishings as well as other products. I drew some inspiration from their website. Be sure to check out their Instagram and Pinterest for more ideas.

Afterwards, I decided to make a few collages of some things I would like to have in my ideal room. Enjoy!

My dream library and reading space would include:

  • Pendant lighting
    • Although I prefer reading in natural light, good artificial lighting is a must. I can’t read if I can’t see.
  • A coffee table
    • I don’t drink coffee, but I’d like to have a place for my glass of water. Better yet I’d leave snacks lying around. That way I wouldn’t have to leave my reading room for hours.
  • Bookshelves
    • I’ve always wanted floor to ceiling shelves full of books. Even then I’m not sure I’ll have enough space.
  • An armchair
    • As much as I like the idea of reading while standing up, my laziness will inevitably kick in. I need a nice seat because finding a comfortable reading position is already enough of struggle on its own.

For more inspiration, try browsing the pendant lighting and dining room tables page.

  • A pretty view
    • For some reason I really like the idea of looking out a bay window to see a beautiful view of the city.

How do you envision your ideal library or dream reading space?

Writing

Things Writers Do

Three things writers do more often than not:

Writers listen. 

Very well. Don’t be surprised when we remember what you said last week in the evening after dinner.

Writers study people.

No, we’re not stalking you. We have better things to do. 

Writers dream and daydream. 

Let us. And forgive us. 

Creative Writing

Memories

A missing piece

A wasted thought

A broken dream

Personal Reflection

Dilemmas

I need a vacation. Like right now. This very second.

Of course, I’d read, write, blog, and dance during my days off.

Just as long as I don’t have to go to school or deal with stupidity, I will be the happiest person alive.

Let a girl dream.

Continue reading if you want to hear my other dilemma.

So I’m supposed to be studying for a test, but blogging is a billion times more enjoyable.

Someone needs to make an app that automatically disables my WordPress account anytime I should be doing homework or reviewing for an exam. Maybe then my marks won’t have to suffer. By suffer, I mean 80’s or 90’s. Not 100. I never seem to get perfect on anything these days, which doesn’t bother me so much since I’m spending more time surrounded by words.

Writing. Exciting.

Blogging. Amazing.

Reading. Humbling.

School. Bad.

Tests. Worse.

Studying. Words cannot even begin to describe my feelings towards this.