Personal Reflection

There Are So Many Things I Want To Do

Sometimes, I wish I could do everything, but that’s not possible. I only have 24 hours.

I used to be so stubborn about sticking to several daily habits.

Every now and then, some things have to give. I can’t do it all or do everything well. I’ve become more accepting of that fact nowadays.

I want to do many things and do them for a certain length of time or until I reach a specific goal. For example, I try to dance for one hour and read about 50 pages every day.

Nevertheless, I try not to let my current habits stop me from pursuing other opportunities.

I’m content with what I’ve done, yet I’ll continue to do more.

Life is a journey. My growth is ongoing, not a one-time event. So rather than beating myself up over a habit I didn’t do, I will appreciate all the things I did.

I journal before bed, and I’ve been tracking what I accomplish. That way, I can look back on a record of how I spend my time. Which is eye-opening to say the least.

I feel like human beings aren’t always the best at time management for a number of reasons. Tracking what I do and how long it takes me to complete a task has paid dividends. I now have a better understanding of when I should start an activity and when I can finish it.

Of course, I’m not perfect. Some days are good, others are bad. But knowing how I work allows me to plan ahead and account for worst-case scenarios.

Productivity

Some Important Things To Remember About Habits

It’s OK if you miss a day. You don’t have to do everything every day.

Start small. One hour might be too much, but ten minutes is more realistic. Don’t try to do too much right away.

Consistency is crucial. Forget about the results or numbers. Putting in a little bit of work every day beats doing a whole lot once in a blue moon. Your progress adds up.

Adapt accordingly. You’re allowed to change your habits.

Keep a diary or journal where you can jot down your habits. That way, you’re able to look back and see what you accomplished.

Simplify. If you’re over complicating the process, you’re less likely to do the habit. Make it easier on yourself to do the things you want to do.

Prioritize your habits. Not every habit is equal. So when you’re having an especially busy day, know what to put first and what can wait.

You can try to kill two birds with one stone. Be careful you aren’t dividing your attention though.

Find a balance. You don’t have to turn all your hobbies into habits. Sometimes, you’re better off having some flexibility.

Push yourself but never to the point of pain.

Daily habits shouldn’t hold you back from trying new things. No matter what, life will happen to you whether you like it or not. So live every day.

Writing

Struggling To Write As Of Late

I’ve been struggling to write as of late. Technically, I’m still writing, but it’s been a grind.

I still love writing. Sometimes I have bad days or bad weeks though.

I’m not sure when I started writing every day. Safe to say, it’s been a long time. No, I don’t always write as much as I want to. But I never want an excuse to get in the way.

Being a writer really is like having homework every night for the rest of your life. I hope I’m still working away decades from now as an old grandma.

When I first decided to make writing a daily habit, I didn’t realize what I was signing up for. I’m only 20 years old. Assuming I live a long time, I have many days ahead of me. Which also means I’ll be writing a lot of words.

Growing up, I wrote without a care in the world. I didn’t think about anything else except putting pen to paper. I wasn’t writing to please other people. I was just having fun.

These days, I think I’ve been making the creative process a lot harder than it needs to be. I’m overthinking before I even make a mark on the page. That’s no way to write.

Here’s to letting go of all the doubts and fears. Just write. Don’t worry so much about the other stuff.

Personal Reflection

Celebrate The Small Things In Life

It’s important to celebrate the small things in life, especially on hard days.

I have a few daily goals: reading, writing, blogging, dancing, and journaling. They’re small acts that make a big difference.

Obviously, doing something every day isn’t easy. Even more so when those things aren’t mandatory.

But I want to create. I need creative outlets, so I can express myself. Or else I’d lose my mind.

At this point, I feel odd not sticking with my habits every day. Because I’m so used to my routines, I don’t always realize how much progress I’ve made.

Sometimes I forget to celebrate small wins. But they often lead to bigger and better victories.

Journaling

My Journaling Journey

I started journaling on August 22, 2015. My birthday of all days.

I strive for one page. It doesn’t take too long to do, but I have enough space to express and explore my thoughts. The notebook I’m using currently is quite large, so I aim for half.

I love how calming and relaxing the process is.

Growing up, I used to have trouble falling asleep. I would stay up obsessing over everything. But journaling allows me to externalize my worries, fears, etc.

I journal every night, which helps clear my mind before bed. After all, I get to dump my concerns down on the page.

In a way, it’s therapeutic too.

I know no one will read my journal, so I let myself write what I want. I can be honest and speak my mind. Besides, I’m not writing to impress or please anyone.

I’m happy to say I’ve stuck with the habit every day for two years, nearly three now.

At times, my journal is like a diary. I enjoy recounting my day. What I did, what I didn’t do even.

Sometimes I’ll look back and reread my old entries. I love seeing how far I’ve come.

I don’t want to stop, so I plan to keep journaling.

Besides, I’m so used to picking up a pen and opening up the notebook. I don’t have to think about it.

I’m beginning to realize many of the things I do on a daily basis is out of habit. At one point, I decided to journal, to blog, to write.

I still choose to reach for a pen instead of the remote, open my journal instead of Facebook.

After all, good habits shouldn’t die hard.

Writing

20 Quirks & Strange Habits: The Weird Side of Famous Writers

I love infographics a little too much for my own good. Even better, the one below is all about writers. Thanks Jack Milgram for creating and sharing.

Enjoy!

When it comes to writing, do you have any unique idiosyncrasies?

Writing

How To Make Writing A Habit And Maintain It

I have many bad habits, but I also have a few good ones.

This is my advice for building a habit like writing and not breaking it three days in.

Be realistic.

Especially when you’re first starting out. You don’t want to set your sights so high that you have trouble reaching them. That can get discouraging real fast. Look at your life and lifestyle right now. How much time can you realistically commit to writing without letting other things slip or worse, suffer? It’s important you’re honest with yourself when making beginning a new habit.

Block out time.

Whether it’s ten minutes or two hours. Your creative time is sacred. Unless your house is burning down, don’t get up from your seat until you’re done.

Set goals.

Short and long term. Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly. Maybe you want to work for half an hour or perhaps write a thousand words. Besides, it isn’t as daunting to write 500 words every day as it is writing a 50,000 word novel. Having a clear idea of what you’re trying to accomplish ultimately gives you smaller benchmarks to hit with each writing session. At the very least, you’ll feel like you’re getting things done slowly but surely. It all adds up over the course of a year.

Track your habit.

There are a number of ways to do this. A notebook. An app on your phone. After a few days, you might feel less inclined to break your streak. Hopefully, you’ll push through and keep going even on days you don’t want to.

Hold yourself accountable.

Better yet find a friend to make sure you follow through with your habits and goals. Have someone check in often by asking you about your progress. You can always return the favour.

Use incentives.

Rewards are a great motivator when it comes to getting work done. Take advantage of the things that make you more willing to put pen to paper.

Have non-incentives.

On the other hand, you can have consequences when you procrastinate or make excuses. Monetary ones work well. Give your mom, sister, whoever five dollars every time you skip out on writing. Suddenly you aren’t as inclined to miss a session, huh?

Although I use writing as an example, the advice above can apply for almost any habit you’re trying to establish.

Good luck maintaining your habits!

Writing

Forgetting And Following

I forgot an idea I had. I want to say it was a good one. Too bad I’ll never know now.

I guess I have a habit of remembering bad ideas and forgetting good ones. Although, by that logic, maybe those good ideas aren’t so good after all.

I know, I know. I should have written down my brilliant idea. But by the time I got around to doing so, I forget all about it. And now I’m annoyed I can’t remember what I wanted to write about.

A part of me wishes someone could follow me around, recording all my ideas down.

On second thought, forget I ever said that. I do not want anyone following me around. I don’t care how much I love you. Ideally I’d spend about 22 hours in a day alone. 2 hours of interaction with other human beings is enough, don’t you think?

I really hate forgetting ideas. Why can’t my brain just remember them…