Productivity

How To Have A Productive Day

Or at least a semi-productive one.

Feel free to use what works and discard what doesn’t.

  • Wake up early. Earlier than you normally do. That way, you have more time. In a perfect world, you’d go to bed earlier the night before.
  • Tackle the most difficult task first. Especially if you’ve been procrastinating. Get it out of the way. At the very least, start something.
  • Bunch things together. For instance, let’s assume you need to use the computer for a bunch of tasks. Try to complete all three at once rather than turning on your computer multiple times during the day. Get all your groceries in one trip. Run a bunch of errands together. Pay your bills at the same time.
  • Break up big projects into small tasks. If only so you’re not as overwhelmed by all you have to do.
  • Have incentives. Motivate yourself to work hard with rewards. It can be a piece of candy or a night out with friends.
  • Multi-task, don’t multi-focus. It’s almost impossible to focus on two or more tasks and do them well. It is possible to do two things that don’t split your attention or require intense concentration though. For example, listen to a podcast while washing the dishes.
  • Get rid of distractions. Go to another room that doesn’t have a tablet, TV, etc. Ask a family member to change the Wi-Fi password. Or get a friend to hide your smartphone.

Here’s to having a productive day year.

Writing

How To Make Writing A Habit And Maintain It

I have many bad habits, but I also have a few good ones.

This is my advice for building a habit like writing and not breaking it three days in.

Be realistic.

Especially when you’re first starting out. You don’t want to set your sights so high that you have trouble reaching them. That can get discouraging real fast. Look at your life and lifestyle right now. How much time can you realistically commit to writing without letting other things slip or worse, suffer? It’s important you’re honest with yourself when making beginning a new habit.

Block out time.

Whether it’s ten minutes or two hours. Your creative time is sacred. Unless your house is burning down, don’t get up from your seat until you’re done.

Set goals.

Short and long term. Daily, weekly, monthly, yearly. Maybe you want to work for half an hour or perhaps write a thousand words. Besides, it isn’t as daunting to write 500 words every day as it is writing a 50,000 word novel. Having a clear idea of what you’re trying to accomplish ultimately gives you smaller benchmarks to hit with each writing session. At the very least, you’ll feel like you’re getting things done slowly but surely. It all adds up over the course of a year.

Track your habit.

There are a number of ways to do this. A notebook. An app on your phone. After a few days, you might feel less inclined to break your streak. Hopefully, you’ll push through and keep going even on days you don’t want to.

Hold yourself accountable.

Better yet find a friend to make sure you follow through with your habits and goals. Have someone check in often by asking you about your progress. You can always return the favour.

Use incentives.

Rewards are a great motivator when it comes to getting work done. Take advantage of the things that make you more willing to put pen to paper.

Have non-incentives.

On the other hand, you can have consequences when you procrastinate or make excuses. Monetary ones work well. Give your mom, sister, whoever five dollars every time you skip out on writing. Suddenly you aren’t as inclined to miss a session, huh?

Although I use writing as an example, the advice above can apply for almost any habit you’re trying to establish.

Good luck maintaining your habits!

Writing

How To Get Motivated To Write

Because sometimes we all need a little motivation to write. Or maybe that problem only plagues me.

Below are my top nine tips.

Give yourself incentives.

Big or small, an incentive usually excites you enough to sit down and write. Also remember to reward yourself often, especially after an accomplishment.

Read, read, read.

Reading great work by other authors should push you to produce something just as great—if not—better.

Start writing.

The act of writing can motivate you to write. Easy to say, hard to execute. Give it a go regardless. You have nothing to lose.

Accountability instills responsibility.

Holding yourself accountable or having someone else occasionally check in on you is a good strategy.

The inspirational people.

Surround yourself with mentors, friends, along with anyone who has a strong work ethic as well as a knack for getting things done. They don’t have to be writers.

The other people.

The doubters, critics, haters, and basically anyone who isn’t in love with you. After all proving people wrong is what writers do best.

Try music.

Need to set the mood? Listening to a specific song or a particular playlist can be the trick you need.

Establish a routine.

We are creatures of habit. If you make it a habit to write, you’ll be more inclined to do it every day.

Don’t forget to set goals.

These are simple math equations:

Goals = Motivation

No Goals = No Motivation

I’ve shared what works for me. Now what gets you motivated to write?

A huge thank you to Agent Hunter for the idea to blog about getting motivated to write. And if you’re searching for an agent, that site is your best friend. Literary agents represent authors, helping them to negotiate contracts with publishing houses, film producers, etc.