Reading

The Curse Of Misty Wayfair By Jamie Jo Wright | A Book Review

Title: The Curse of Misty Wayfair

Author: Jamie Jo Wright

Genre: Suspense

About the book: It alternates between the perspectives of two women, Thea and Heidi, in different time periods, seeking answers to questions regarding their identity.

Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

First impressions: I’ve read and liked a couple of Wright’s novels in the past. Even though I thought I’d enjoy the plot, I found it hard to get into at first.

Characters: Both Thea and Heidi are flawed but relatable. There are several characters in each story, but I didn’t find it too difficult to keep track of them. That said, keeping track of everybody’s relation to other family members took a bit more work.

Quote:

“So much of life is a mystery, and so often it is left unsolved.”

Writing: I appreciated the representation of mental illness and special needs. The author addresses issues like autism as well as anxiety. I wasn’t expecting that, but they add more depth to the characters and to the story.

I’m also a fan of the subtle romance because it didn’t overshadow the main storylines.

Final thoughts: By the end, I wanted to know how all the pieces fit together. I love novels like this one where I can’t quite predict all the twists and turns. In my opinion, the ending was the most interesting.

The Curse of Misty Wayfair won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but it’s a complex narrative about important issues.


Do you have an arc or galley I should read? Check out my Book Review Policy.

Feel free to add me as a friend on Goodreads to keep up with what I’m reading.

This post contains affiliate links to Book Depository. If you make a purchase through them, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks!

Reading

The Reckoning At Gossamer Pond By Jamie Jo Wright | A Book Review

Title: The Reckoning At Gossamer Pond

Author: Jamie Jo Wright

Genre: Romantic Suspense

About the book: It’s a story following two female protagonists, Libby and Annalise.

Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

First impressions: I read Wright’s debut novel, The House on Foster Hill, earlier this year. I liked it, so I figured I’d read another book by her. The stories are similar in style but different in many ways.

I think the cover is great. I also feel like the colours help establish the tone of the book.

Characters: I love that everyone is flawed, especially the main characters. They all seem to have secrets, and that makes them more relatable.

The female protagonists are great, and the male characters are likeable as well.

Quote:

“Never refrain from saying what you think.”

Writing: The story jumps between the past and present. I think Wright did a good job because the novel flows well.

There is more suspense than romance, which is totally fine by me.

Final thoughts: I didn’t predict the ending, but I enjoyed it nonetheless. One antagonist is more surprising to me than the other.

Overall, The Reckoning At Gossamer Pond is a good read. It’s not my favourite, but I had fun. If you like romance, religion, and suspense, check out Wright’s latest novel.


Do you have an arc or galley I should read? Check out my Book Review Policy.

Feel free to add me as a friend on Goodreads to keep up with what I’m reading.

This post contains affiliate links to Book Depository. If you make a purchase through them, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks!

Reading

The House On Foster Hill By Jamie Jo Wright | A Book Review

Title: The House On Foster Hill

Author: Jamie Jo Wright

Genre: Romantic Suspense

About the book: A debut novel by Wright told in alternating viewpoints. Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.

First impressions: I didn’t know what I was getting myself into, but it got more and more interesting. The beginning sets the stage for the novel to play out at a decent pace.

Summary: The book switches between the perspectives of Ivy and Kaine. Ivy tries to find out the identity of a dead woman. Kaine’s husband dies, so she moves away to start anew. Both women have pasts holding them back from living in the moment and enjoying what life has to offer.

Characters: Ivy works with Joel in the past while Kaine meets a man named Grant in the present. They’re similar in some ways but different enough to be distinct individuals. The women have flaws yet Kaine and Ivy do their best.

Quote:

“Sometimes the only way you can silence the bad being done and protect the ones you love is to hold it all inside and never beathe a word.”

Conflict: The author tackles an important issue that isn’t talked about enough.

Writing: The writing is well done. I liked the contrast between the early 1900s and modern day. Wright does a good job with the different time periods. Even though I didn’t find the pacing too slow, it picks up at the end. Everything falls into place and unanswered questions are answered. In my opinion, I found some of the plot twists hard to predict, but they made sense nonetheless.

Final thoughts: A lot happens in the conclusion. I have a feeling this story will stick with me. For a variety of reasons, it’s a memorable read.

I’m pleasantly surprised at the fact that the book doesn’t have too many touchy-feely scenes. Wright strikes a nice balance. The storylines aren’t overwhelmed by romantic relationships.

The House On Foster Hill blends many different elements together for an interesting read.


Feel free to add me as a friend on Goodreads to keep up with what I’m reading.

This post contains affiliate links to Book Depository. If you make a purchase using them, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thanks!