Personal Reflection

Trying To Trust The Process

There are so many things I want to do before I die. And it’s hard to be patient. But I’m trying to trust the process.

I think I overthink. No, I know I do. I make everything more complicated than it needs to be, which is exhausting.

I’ll do better. I will do my best.

I can’t be anyone else. I can only be myself. Sometimes I feel like an imposter. Who am I to write, to create?

I tend to elevate others and downplay my own abilities. So in my mind, everyone is better than me. On bad days, I wonder why even try if I’ll never be good enough? Why bother in the first place?

Life is too short. I used to be afraid of dying. But right now, I’m scared I’m not living up to my full potential. I need to face my own fears. It’s fine to fail. To be ignored or rejected.

I wish I didn’t take things too personally. I should grow a thicker layer of skin.

I don’t have any major regrets though. I wouldn’t change my choices. Still, I’ll continue to grow. I want to focus on improving myself.

It’s not always how you start but how you finish, right?

Writing

Advice On Breaking Into A Creative Industry

  • Do more than you have to, especially when you’re first starting out. Don’t just do the bare minimum and call it a day.
  • Always find people who will challenge you to improve. Never surround yourself around those don’t care if you stay stagnant.
  • Ask hard questions. Learn how to. And when you get an answer, listen. Sometimes you might not get an answer or you’ll get a no. That’s okay.
  • Don’t try to be perfect. The world won’t end if you mess up or make a mistake.
  • You’re not above anything or anyone. Kindness goes a long way.
  • Deliver on time. Fulfill your end of the deal. If you make a promise, keep it. If you can’t, don’t make one.
  • Chase down chances. No one’s going to hand you anything.
  • Be willing. You may not be the best or the brightest. But if you’re willing to put in the time and effort to get better, you’ll go a long way.
  • Show up and have something to show. Show up on time. Better yet, be early to events, meetings, etc.
  • Trust the process. It’s a long journey. Keep grinding. Trust your work ethic. Stop making excuses. Stop complaining. Put your head down and hustle. Do the work. Get it done.
  • Differentiate yourself. Embrace your differences. Stand out from the rest of the crowd. You’re not anyone else, so be the best version of yourself.
Blogging · Writing

My Blog Post Writing Process

My blog post writing process has changed a lot over the years. As of right now, I have a routine That works well enough for me.

Writing

I handwrite most of my posts with a pen and a notepad. I tend to talk about whatever’s on my mind, so I don’t really need to research beforehand.

Transcribing

Next, I transcribe my hand written posts. I used to type them up word for word, but now I use the voice dictation feature on my phone.

Editing

Finally, I edit a post until I’m happy with it. Of course, nothing is ever perfect. But I try to aim for clarity. I also like being concise, so I tend to delete a lot. Time is valuable, which is why I’d hate to waste mine. More importantly, I would hate to waste yours.

I don’t say this often enough, but I truly appreciate each and everyone of you who stops by my blog. Thanks for reading!

Personal Reflection

What Do You Want Out Of Life?

I want to be happy. I hope I’m able to do what I want to do.

My health is important to me. But sometimes I do things at the expense of my well-being.

Even though I worry so much about so many things, writing helps. When there’s nothing to stress over, my mind makes something up. At least getting my thoughts and feelings on the page takes some of the weight off my shoulders.

This year has been tough for reasons out of my control. So I’ve tried hard to focus on what I can control.

Word by word, day by day is my motto. I don’t want to get too far ahead of myself. Sometimes though I can’t stop thinking about the far future.

I like to believe everything will work out somehow. The pieces will fall into place eventually.

For now, I want to concentrate on the present moment. I need to enjoy each day.

I love what I do because I love the act of doing them. It’s the process, the journey that matters. Not the numbers, not the results.

While I don’t know everything, I know I want to learn. Even if it terrifies me. I want to learn more. I want to better myself as a human being.

I’m always learning. I love teaching myself. Going at my own pace, putting in a little bit of work every day.

Writing

Every Story You Tell Has A Purpose

Every story you tell has a purpose, even when it feels like there isn’t one.

Sometimes your stories fail or you abandon them halfway through. But they still serve a purpose.

Finishing a project teaches you a lot along the way. You have to be resilient and persevere in the face of adversity.

Short stories pave the way for longer ones. If writing an epic novel seems daunting, try penning a novella first.

You learn your strengths. Eventually, you find out what you’re good at.

You learn your weaknesses. And then you know where to improve.

With each story, you become a better writer. After all, practice makes progress.

Some stories will test your faith. Others will restore it.

You’ll fall in love with writing all over again. It’s a wonderful feeling.

You realize not every story will see the light of day, and that’s okay.

You develop thicker skin. The stories you send out into the world will inevitably encounter some sort of resistance or rejection.

You’re inspired to write new stories. One character who didn’t pan out in an old piece might be the perfect inspiration for a protagonist or antagonist down the road. You just never know.

You gain empathy. Every time you put yourself in someone else’s shoes, you’re forced to see where he or she is coming from.

You get experience. Your own experience, but it’s still experience.

You build confidence, which is key in writing. Besides, with confidence comes opportunity.

You have more chances to ask for feedback. Scary but necessary.

Your writing process changes. Life happens. Adapt. Adjust.

If nothing else, remember that the stories you tell matter.

Editing

My Editing Process

I’ve edited essays until my eyes hurt, so I figured I’d break down my process to better understand how I operate. For those moments I don’t remember what to do when faced with a terrible first draft.

I tend to start from the beginning and work my way to the end. It seems the most logical to me.

I’m not sure where I’d even begin if I didn’t start with the first sentence. That being said, reading backwards is a good strategy to catch spelling mistakes.

When I’m on the computer, I make content changes. This involves cutting, rewriting, as well as moving ideas around. It’s just easier to copy and paste on a computer than on a phone.

I make edits to the content first before I get to the mechanics or the smaller but still significant details like grammar. Once I’m happy with the placement of each sentence, I move on to making everything sound better.

I almost always take a break to get away from my slightly-improved-but-still-needs-plenty-of-improvement essays. I think about anything else in the world not related to editing.

I come back with a fresher pair of eyes and a re-energized mind.

Then I do technical edits on my phone. It’s convenient because I bring my device with me everywhere I go, so I can access my essays all the time.

I play with words until I find the perfect one. Two seconds later, I resign myself to the fact that perfection is impossible. Again, I work in a chronological fashion.

I know I’m done when I try to change something but end up liking the original better. I came up with a new title once, but I ultimately went with the old one.

Editing is a time-consuming process. There aren’t any corners you can cut. Just do your best. Who knows, you may even surprise yourself when all is said and done.

Writing

My Novel Writing Process

I’ve written some novels in my lifetime. But whenever I undertake a new one, I’m not sure how I’ll make it to the end. This is a glimpse into my writing process.

Brainstorming

I’m a character-centric writer. Always have been, always will be. So I tend to come up with an interesting person and throw conflict at him or her as I go.

Outlining

Based on past experience, if I had to outline every novel for the rest of my life, I’d be on pace to never finish another one ever again. I sort of outline in my head. Depends on your definition of outlining though.

Writing

It isn’t too bad once I get past the beginning and middle.

Researching

I tend to research after I finish an initial draft where I brainstorm my own ideas first.

Waiting

I like to wait a long time in between writing the first draft and all that follows after.

Transcribing  

I handwrite most of my novels, so at some point, I have to type everything up onto the computer.

Critiquing

The one novel I sought feedback on was incomplete at the time, and it still is about six years after the fact. At least I like critiquing my own work. I’d much rather crush my own ego than have someone else do so.

Rewriting

I enjoy losing my sanity and seeing improvements at the same time.

Editing

Some stories don’t even get this far. What a shame.

Publishing

Obviously, I’m not at this stage yet. If my dreams come true, I don’t know how I’ll refrain myself from talking about my books.

Procrastinating

I procrastinate so much it’s a miracle I get anything done on time. Sadly, I put things off at all stages of the novel writing process. Nothing like consistency, am I right?

Reading

Even when I’m writing a novel and it’s a priority like during NaNoWriMo, I try to read as much as I can. Books inspire me. Other stories have inspired my own.

Celebrating

I celebrate the small victories as much or maybe even more than the big ones. I believe in rewarding myself. Otherwise, my motivation would be six feet under.

What’s your novel writing process like? I’d love to know.

Writing

My Essay Writing Process

  1. Freak out.
  2. Freak out some more.
  3. Start to brainstorm.
  4. Generate many ideas.
  5. Hate most ideas.
  6. Pick the best worst idea.
  7. Shrug once.
  8. Scrap said idea for a better one.
  9. Try to outline.
  10. Fail to outline.
  11. Attempt to write a first draft.
  12. Edit first draft before it’s written.
  13. Write enough words to meet the word count.
  14. Delete unnecessary words.
  15. Squint at word count.
  16. Write more words.
  17. Realize there are too many words.
  18. Kill my darlings.
  19. Submit the poorly written essay.
  20. Celebrate by crying.