Productivity

Some Important Things To Remember About Habits

It’s OK if you miss a day. You don’t have to do everything every day.

Start small. One hour might be too much, but ten minutes is more realistic. Don’t try to do too much right away.

Consistency is crucial. Forget about the results or numbers. Putting in a little bit of work every day beats doing a whole lot once in a blue moon. Your progress adds up.

Adapt accordingly. You’re allowed to change your habits.

Keep a diary or journal where you can jot down your habits. That way, you’re able to look back and see what you accomplished.

Simplify. If you’re over complicating the process, you’re less likely to do the habit. Make it easier on yourself to do the things you want to do.

Prioritize your habits. Not every habit is equal. So when you’re having an especially busy day, know what to put first and what can wait.

You can try to kill two birds with one stone. Be careful you aren’t dividing your attention though.

Find a balance. You don’t have to turn all your hobbies into habits. Sometimes, you’re better off having some flexibility.

Push yourself but never to the point of pain.

Daily habits shouldn’t hold you back from trying new things. No matter what, life will happen to you whether you like it or not. So live every day.

Reading

How To Remember What Books You’ve Read

Unless you have a perfect memory, it’s tough to remember all the books you’ve read. But how can you keep a record of everything your eyes have pored over or skimmed? 

You want to remember the texts you read, don’t you? Imagine thinking you finished a book but not being entirely sure you did. It almost feels like a bookshelf falling to the ground.

Here are ways to remember the amazing, terrible, and mediocre books you’ve read. 

Use Goodreads. 

Goodreads is a godsend, especially since you can access it on a computer, laptop, or smartphone. I can’t believe I took nearly 18 years to make an account. If you’re looking for an online website where you can track books you’ve read and what you want to read next, get on Goodreads.

Keep a reader notebook. 

On the other hand, who doesn’t love using a physical notebook to record all the books they’ve read. I write down the author and title along with when I started and finished the text. I also tried getting into journaling about the books I’ve read to help myself with writing reviews after I’ve finished reading something. But so far, I don’t find myself reaching for that journal very often. Habits are hard to build.

Create an Excel spreadsheet.

Spreadsheets are fun, doubly so if they’re colourful. If you don’t want to make a Goodreads account but want a digital log, an Excel sheet might work well for you.

How do you remember what you read?

Writing

Forgetting And Following

I forgot an idea I had. I want to say it was a good one. Too bad I’ll never know now.

I guess I have a habit of remembering bad ideas and forgetting good ones. Although, by that logic, maybe those good ideas aren’t so good after all.

I know, I know. I should have written down my brilliant idea. But by the time I got around to doing so, I forget all about it. And now I’m annoyed I can’t remember what I wanted to write about.

A part of me wishes someone could follow me around, recording all my ideas down.

On second thought, forget I ever said that. I do not want anyone following me around. I don’t care how much I love you. Ideally I’d spend about 22 hours in a day alone. 2 hours of interaction with other human beings is enough, don’t you think?

I really hate forgetting ideas. Why can’t my brain just remember them…

Personal Reflection

Remember In December…

  • You don’t have to be right.
  • You don’t have to be perfect.
  • You don’t have to do everything in one day.
  • You don’t have to go everywhere all at once.
  • You don’t need anyone’s approval.
  • You don’t need anyone’s permission.
Writing

Don’t Argue With A Writer

Why not?

Because:

  • Writers remember everything you say.
  • You’re going to lose.
  • Writers remember everything you did.
  • You won’t win.
  • Writers remember everything you didn’t say.
  • You’ll lose more than you’ll win.
  • Writers remember everything you didn’t do.
  • You will not win anything but you will lose everything.

Don’t say I never told you so.

Personal Reflection

Remembrance Day/Veterans’ Day

I haven’t forgotten about the significance of today.

Each time November 11th rolls around, I always think about how lucky and grateful I am.

But I remember writing an unpublished article a while back titled “In December, Do We Still Remember?”

To summarize it, I reflected on how most people tend to remember the heroes who fought for them only once a year. We should remember all the time. We certainly shouldn’t just be reminded to when we see a red poppy pinned to someone’s jacket.

So “this year and subsequent years afterwards, strive to keep the memory alive year-round.”

Writing

10 Reasons Why You Never Start An Argument With A Writer

  1. You are completely wrong.
  2. You are not completely right.
  3. You will lose miserably.
  4. You will not win unfortunately.
  5. You will look stupid, ignorant or ridiculous.
  6. You may regret it.
  7. You may ruin your ego.
  8. You may suffer physically, mentally, and emotionally.
  9. You may remember it forever.
  10. You just don’t.