Tweeting

To Tweet Or Not To Tweet

As a writer, I feel I should like Twitter. Of all the platforms, Twitter seems the most suited for writers.

I’ve just never been much of a social media user. I don’t always know what to say or share, especially online. Sometimes I think about sharing something but then stop myself for some reason.

In a way, tweeting is similar to blogging. I guess I’d rather spend more time writing or reading.

Also, there aren’t enough hours in the day to be everywhere and to do everything.

Perhaps I need to tweet about something unrelated to me. I’m not one to share personal details about myself in real life or on social media.

I’m better at writing than I am at posting. I have no problem drafting a tweet. But sending it out into the world is a different story.

It’s not easy to create content on a consistent basis. It’s even harder when these days almost anyone can criticize you.

I don’t know if I’ll ever get into Twitter. Don’t get me started on Instagram. I suck at social media. Big surprise, I know. So kudos to everyone who doesn’t.

Some days, I wonder if I was born in the wrong era. I need a time machine. Take me back to the days before social media existed.

Personal Reflection

Working Hard In Silence

I think there’s something to be said about working hard in silence and not always announcing your accomplishments to the whole world.

I don’t want to brag or show off. I also don’t want to show anybody up.

Going forward, I just want to live my life quietly. I’m not sure why, but I don’t feel the need to share my successes with anybody or everybody all the time. Of course, I share some details, but I don’t share a lot.

There are things I want to achieve in my lifetime that I’ve never told anyone. If and when I do accomplish them, I’ll probably keep some things to myself. Then again, I like surprising people who underestimate me.

When I’m working away, I avoid talking about my progress. I’m not the best at selling myself, so I’d be awful at promoting my own work.

I want to be someone who works hard and goes about my business every day. Which is part of the reason why I don’t post much on social media.

I literally enjoy working in silence. Noise will be the death of me.

I like to believe that if I want something badly enough, I will work for it. If I don’t want it, I won’t. And that’s okay.

When it comes to my career, I feel I have a good idea of what I want. I probably have an even better idea of what I don’t want.

All this being said, I’ll talk about big milestones until my dying breath. But the small wins often stay close to my chest. I’ve just never been one for the spotlight.

After all, the strongest people survive battles no one else knows about. The smartest know when to stay silent and just listen.

More than anything, I have to define success on my own terms.

Writing

How To Stay Positive As A Writer

It’s not easy staying positive as a writer, especially when the world keeps rejecting your work.

But positivity is a beautiful thing. Here’s to keeping your optimism alive and well.

  • Celebrate small wins. You came up with an idea? You wrote one sentence? You edited a paragraph? Celebrate that. It’s easy to overlook all the little things in life. You may feel like you aren’t making progress, but if you’re putting in the work every day, life will fall into place. Besides, small wins add up to big victories over time.
  • Look back. Remember all you’ve achieved.
  • Look forward. Think about the things you can accomplish.
  • Treat yourself. You deserve it. Play. How fun. Do other activities.
  • Be aware of your thoughts and feelings. Humans tend to focus on the negatives. Say positive affirmations. Whatever they may be.
  • Filter out the noise. There’s a lot of sounds or voices around at any given time. You don’t have to listen to all of it.
  • Use social media in moderation. Spending all day on Facebook isn’t that productive and probably won’t leave you feeling too proud.
  • Exercise often. Endorphins are a wonderful thing.
  • Choose what you read carefully. Reading is amazing. But the media you consume can have an impact on your own emotions.
  • Go for a walk outside. Soak up the sun’s rays. Vitamin D is good for your health.
  • Write for yourself. Create what you want. Tell the stories you need to tell. You’re different and unique. You aren’t anyone else, so don’t pretend to be someone you’re not.
Personal Reflection

The Need To Disconnect And Connect

I feel the need to disconnect all the time, especially in a world where thanks to the internet or social media more specifically, we’re increasingly connected to each other.

Some days I’m better at disconnecting than others. Finding that perfect balance presents a challenge.

Recently, I’ve noticed I’m not able to concentrate as long as I used to.

I remember the good old days where I finished books in one day as I would sit down and read for hours on end. I went without interruptions or distractions for long periods of time.

But now I’ll read for about an hour, feel the urge to check my phone, and ultimately, give in to the temptation. Then I’ll get carried away on Twitter or Instagram. Before I know it, I’ve spent half my day on social media. Hyperbolic statements are part of Herminia’s brand. So is referring to myself in third person.

I realize I may not disconnect as much as I used to, but I do my best. It’s important to step away from the screen. My sensitive eyes appreciate it.

Also, I’ve gotten used to carrying my phone with me everywhere I go. Some days I wonder how I’d survive if I left my mobile at home either accidentally or intentionally.

It’s not easy to disconnect, at least not if you’ve grown up so connected. But the difficulty makes disconnecting that much more rewarding.

If you’re wondering where all this is coming from, I’m currently taking three media classes. For fun, I read a chapter of a book, which discussed how social media has changed our ability to connect and concentrate.

So lately I’ve been thinking about my relationship to media and how it affects my happiness, productivity, etc.

As of right now, I’m ready to disconnect and go to bed. I’ll connect or reconnect with the world tomorrow.

Writing

10 Things To Assume About Writers

I know I preach to the choir that one should not assume. But if I know nothing about you except that you’re a writer, I’m going to make an exception.

Here are ten things I associate with writers.

  1. You read. If you’re a writer, you’re a reader. So don’t be surprised if I ask you what you’re currently reading or what novels you’ve enjoyed in the past. Bonding over books is the best type of bonding after all. 
  2. You’re observant. Writers are amazing at observing everything and everyone. Understatement of the year. Maybe you’re secretly a ninja too. As fun as it is to be detail-oriented, that can also drive you insane. Stay sane.
  3. You support other writers. Since you know the struggle better than anyone, why wouldn’t you encourage others who are also struggling.
  4. You have a good grasp of grammar. But I also understand the urge to disregard rules completely. They were made to be broken, right?
  5. You can empathize. You have to put yourself in the shoes of fictional characters all the time. I hope you can do the same with human beings.
  6. You have an online presence. This is especially true if you’re younger. Facebook. Twitter. A blog. A website. At the very least, I’ll be able to stalk you somewhere on the Web. Oh, don’t get me started on the growing pains of social media. I’m getting so old. 
  7. You’re smart. You probably have a wealth of knowledge in that beautiful brain of yours. Care to share?
  8. You like stories. Hearing them and telling them. I hope you have a lot because I’m all ears. Or if you rather listen to mine, I’d be more than willing to bore you to tears.
  9. You’re working on something. Whether it’s a short story or an epic novel, you probably have a work in progress on your plate. Maybe even multiple projects you’re managing at the same time. Multi-tasking is a way of life. 
  10. You write. If all I know about is that you’re a writer, I’m going to suppose more than anything that you write. I’ll likely proceed to wonder what you dabble in. Fiction? Non-fiction? Fantasy? History?

I think it’s relatively safe to assume writers write words.

Writing

Accurate Phone Usage Breakdown

I’ve come to the realization that I’m not just a teenager with a phone. I’m a writer who owns a powerful piece of technology.

Took me long enough, huh?

This is how I break down my phone usage:

50% writing, working, brainstorming, blogging, etc.

I like words.

20% reading (emails, documents, articles, blog posts)

I like words and stories.

20% listening to music or dancing to it

I like words, stories, and songs.

5% texting or calling

I don’t have many friends.

5% social media

I don’t have many friends in real life.

1% calculator

I can’t do math.

These percentages are exact and precise. They are not distorted at all.

Blogging · Personal Reflection

December 2015: What I Love

Going back through some of my posts from this year and picking out one I’m particularly fond of.

So this happened…

I clicked on “How You Know You Are A Writer“, made some edits to it, then updated the post. But I forgot that it would be publicized on all my social media accounts—again.

Of course, when I realized my mistake people already noticed before me.  My Tumblr followers decided to like and reblog it. Rachel even retweeted it.

So rather than cover it up by deleting my mistake and pretending like it never happened, I’m doing the exact opposite. I’m owning up to my mistake. That’s a first for me.

Let this be known:

I’m human.

I wasn’t originally going to pick “How You Know You Are A Writer“, but then I got careless.

I won’t ask you to guess the post I was thinking of because that’d be cruel.

I’m flawed, but I have a heart.

Personal Reflection

What Won’t Kill You

Did you miss me? No? It’s okay. I didn’t expect you to.

If you noticed that I didn’t post anything on any social media site yesterday, kudos to you. Such an observant individual. You’re one step closer to being a writer. Or a better one.

I took a break from posting and from going on the computer in general. It was a much needed break for me to recharge.

I failed at managing my time on Saturday so I decided to take a day off WordPress, Tumblr, Facebook, etc.

But no worries I’m back. I’m better. I’ll be blogging and being a bother.

Nothing’s wrong. Everything’s fine. In case you thought the worst, in which case you’re probably a writer.

I feel like a brand new person right now. It’s amazing.

Breaks are beneficial. Repeat after me. Breaks are beneficial.

Take one. A day off won’t kill you.