Writing

How To Write Under Time Pressure

Writing is hard enough as it is without the added pressure of having a limited amount of time.

Budgeting time takes on a greater significance when you only have a few hours to write too many essays.

I’ve extracted tips from my tired brain about writing under pressure:

  • Write fast but not too fast. This goes for both handwriting and typing.
  • Production not perfection. Don’t strive to be perfect. Do strive to be done.
  • Be concise, clear. Try to know what you’re writing about to avoid beating around the bush.
  • Prepare accordingly. There’s nothing like a simulation of the real thing. Studying and reviewing is good. Replicating the test conditions as closely as possible is great.
  • Don’t forget to breathe. Like the protagonist in many YA novels, let out that breath you didn’t know you were holding.
  • Try not to overthink. Most teachers aren’t trying to trick you.
  • Just write something. Part marks are better than no marks at all. Get an idea down. It may lead to other ideas.
  • Make connections. Concepts often interconnect. Draw out similarities and differences. Compare or contrast. Brainstorm with a mind map. Outline in a way that work for you.
  • Write until you have nothing else to say. Stick with what you know when possible. Talking about what you don’t know makes your life harder.
  • Use the time given. There’s no reason to stop writing thirty minutes into a three hour exam.
  • Take care of any business beforehand. That way, you’re in a good place physically, mentally, emotionally, etc.
  • Eat and drink beforehand. A hydrated body beats a hungry one.
  • Move on. Especially when you’re stumped. Tackle the next question. You can always come back to a problem later.
  • Play to your strengths. Downplay your weaknesses.
  • Answer what’s asked. Ideally, you do this right off the bat.

If nothing else, remember writing under time pressure is a skill you can cultivate.

Blogging

Blogging 101: Extend Your Brand

Extend your brand with one of the following: a custom Blavatar, a custom image widget, or a fan page.

Brand?

Ehhhhhhhk. That word haunts me.

I finally fixed my Blavatar. (Read: I learned how to upload the newer head-shot I’ve been using for months as my blog picture.) You learn something new everyday.

But I can’t create a custom image to save my life. I’d pay someone to but I’m broke. And I’m about to be even more broke. Perks of going to university this coming September.

Um, uh..I have a failing Facebook page. Once again I’m broke. I’m a full-time student. I’m someone who procrastinates. A lot. If I ever become a full-time blogger, I’ll pay more attention to my other social media accounts. Until then I can blame homework to finish, projects to complete, and deadlines to meet. As well as tests and exams I always cram for because I hate studying.

Brand still haunts me.

From the bottom of my heart, I hope everyone is doing a better job extending their brand.

Personal Reflection

Dilemmas

I need a vacation. Like right now. This very second.

Of course, I’d read, write, blog, and dance during my days off.

Just as long as I don’t have to go to school or deal with stupidity, I will be the happiest person alive.

Let a girl dream.

Continue reading if you want to hear my other dilemma.

So I’m supposed to be studying for a test, but blogging is a billion times more enjoyable.

Someone needs to make an app that automatically disables my WordPress account anytime I should be doing homework or reviewing for an exam. Maybe then my marks won’t have to suffer. By suffer, I mean 80’s or 90’s. Not 100. I never seem to get perfect on anything these days, which doesn’t bother me so much since I’m spending more time surrounded by words.

Writing. Exciting.

Blogging. Amazing.

Reading. Humbling.

School. Bad.

Tests. Worse.

Studying. Words cannot even begin to describe my feelings towards this.

Writing

Preparing For NaNoWriMo

This is how I’m preparing for National Novel Writing Month:

  • Not completing homework.
  • Not studying for tests.
  • Not using the brain.
Studying

13 Effective Study Techniques I Use

With exams right around the corner (for most semester-ed high school students), I’m surprised I managed to dig up an old post (that was first created 5 months ago in August).

I realized this stuff is much more relevant now than during the summer. Even if this doesn’t pertain to you at the moment (full-year guys and gals), it might sometime in the future.

  1. I divide my study time into small sections spaced over the course of a week (if possible).
  2. I ensure I have all the necessary notes before beginning study sessions.
  3. I balance my time as equally as possible with all my courses.
  4. I use the resources I have to my advantage.
  5. I determine what topics/concepts/ideas are most likely going to be covered on the exam or test.
  6. I make full use of study questions, study guides, or previous exams/tests/quizzes if available.
  7. I try to predict possible questions or problems I will be tested on and attempt to answer them accordingly.
  8. I review and relearn, not redo.
  9. I study actively by asking critical-thinking questions.
  10. I choose not to obsess over organizational activities or trivial details.
  11. I apportion my studying time, as well as my exam writing time, according to how much each component of the test is worth.
  12. I memorize what I need to memorize, understand what I need to understand, and explain what I need to explain.
  13. I stimulate the real thing before taking the exam or test.
Personal Reflection · Quotes · Studying

Key To Studying

“The key to studying is not through rote memorization/learning but through applying the material, making connections, and asking questions.”