Writing

25 Synonyms For Look

This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but it’s a reference anyone is free to use.

  1. Admire
  2. Behold
  3. Consider
  4. Eye
  5. Focus
  6. Gaze
  7. Glance
  8. Glimpse
  9. Glower
  10. Heed
  11. Inspect
  12. Leer
  13. Notice
  14. Observe
  15. Peek
  16. Peer
  17. Regard
  18. Review
  19. Scan
  20. Scrutinize
  21. Spy
  22. Squint
  23. Stare
  24. Study
  25. Witness
Reading · Writing

I Love This And I Haven’t Even Read It

I know I’m late, but to be fair, I haven’t seen this book anywhere else until today.

Sorry the picture got cut off. I’m an aspiring writer, not a hopeful photographer.

I have plenty of reading and rereading to do. Yes I love this little guy and I haven’t even read the entire thing yet. But I can’t wait.  The Elements Of Style

Writing

Writing Advice On Friday The 13th

Create something even if you don’t feel like it.

Even if you had a horrible day. Even if the day itself is considered unlucky. 

You won’t regret writing, but you’ll probably regret not writing.

Writing

100 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, And Bloggers

I used to do these tips in segments. Each segment had 25 tips but since time flew by and laziness overcame me, I figured I would resurrect my writing tips, one hundred at a time.

All of these tips are posted on my Facebook page and Twitter account as well.

Enjoy!

  1. A story will tell itself when it’s ready to be told.
  2. Deadlines instill urgency. Urgency usually generates productivity.
  3. It’s never too early or too late to start writing.
  4. Never over explain but never understate. Seek a balance.
  5. Write whatever you want. Draw whatever you will. Perform whatever you can.
  6. You may disagree but do so respectively.
  7. Let your writing speak for itself.
  8. You need to write badly in order to learn how not to write badly.
  9. When criticizing the work, never criticize the writer.
  10. Any amount of preparation is useless if you don’t follow through.
  11. Write like every day was your last.
  12. Stories make the world go around.
  13. Do not aim for perfection. You’ll only be disappointed.
  14. Follow the writing advice you give others.
  15. Writing a first draft is the only time you can ever settle for anything less than your best.
  16. Write like every day was your last.
  17. Write something, anything.
  18. Never confuse typing with writing. They are not one and the same.
  19. Choose every word you use carefully.
  20. Say what you need to—nothing more, nothing less.
  21. You are allowed to break the rules if you know the rules.
  22. A first draft is not perfect. Your job is to perfect it.
  23. There is no right way to write. Likewise, there is no wrong way to write.
  24. Always propel the story forward.
  25. Go back and rediscover why you started writing in the first place.
  26. The first step to success: self-trust.
  27. Test every chapter, every scene, every page, every word.
  28. Concentrate on the process first and foremost. The product comes after.
  29. Change your scenery both literally and figuratively.
  30. Your job as a writer is to bring the dull and mundane details to life.
  31. Search for the unseen in real life and in your novels.
  32. You know you’re finished writing when you’ve said just enough. Nothing more, nothing less.
  33. Read. Write. Repeat.
  34. You can let mistakes drag you down or help build you up.
  35. Some of the best stories come from the worst decisions.
  36. What you write today is not what you will write in a year’s time.
  37. Don’t settle for mediocre. Don’t even settle for good.
  38. Listen to what your stories tell you.
  39. What is unsaid is just as powerful as what is said.
  40. Great writing transcends one individual self.
  41. Turn pain into wisdom.
  42. Throw every idea onto the page. Surely one will stick.
  43. Allow people to read what you write. Let yourself be vulnerable.
  44. Pace yourself.
  45. The tiniest moment will make for a grand story someday.
  46. Numbers don’t matter. Words do.
  47. Know when enough is enough.
  48. When life gives you lemons, turn them into a story.
  49. Start something you know you will be able to finish.
  50. In life, you avoid conflict. In fiction, you embrace it.
  51. Every excess word becomes a vice, a burden.
  52. Hard work knows no limits, no boundaries.
  53. The writing life is what you make it.
  54. Don’t believe everything you hear. Do your research, employ common sense, and ask questions.
  55. Write about the people who fascinate you.
  56. Don’t ever let anyone talk you out of writing.
  57. You will win if you refuse to lose. You will succeed if you refuse to fail.
  58. You cannot write for others. You must write for yourself.
  59. There is a fine line between being fancy and being formal.
  60. When in doubt, leave it out.
  61. You will never use all of your ideas. Your job is to choose which ones you do use.
  62. Fiction is a necessity. That’s why writers exist.
  63. Never start something you won’t finish.
  64. One day your tears, your pain, your hard work will pay off.
  65. Never lose focus, both in your life and in your story.
  66. There will never be ideal conditions to write.
  67. Quality over quantity. Always.
  68. Never agonize over a first draft.
  69. The best have failed and have fallen but have risen.
  70. The first step in becoming a writer is believing you are a writer.
  71. Today you may do something you couldn’t do yesterday.
  72. The only way you will ever finish any novel is to start it.
  73. When you feel like quitting, remember why you started.
  74. Never take criticisms personally.
  75. Everything is difficult in the beginning.
  76. Learn to love writing. Or learn to love something else.
  77. Never let your failures affect your future.
  78. The only way to turn your ideas into reality is to put them on paper.
  79. Ideas can come from anywhere.
  80. First drafts are not perfect. Your job is to perfect them.
  81. Not everyone will like what you write.
  82. Don’t get cocky, conceited, or condescending.
  83. You must choose to never give up.
  84. You cannot blame anyone or anything for your failures.
  85. Being blind to your own mistakes impends your success.
  86. Assume that every word you write could be your last.
  87. A mind in motion tends to stay in motion.
  88. Luck manifests from hard work.
  89. All writers learn from trial and error.
  90. You cannot rush creativity.
  91. Small acts amount to great success.
  92. Edit as though the entire world will read what you have written.
  93. Every ambitious amateur can turn into an amazing artist.
  94. Every artist is a little crazy.
  95. Always leave a part of yourself on the page.
  96. Genius takes work, time, and effort.
  97. You tread on thin ice when you start to repeat yourself, over and over and over again.
  98. In order to write anything worth reading, you have to take risks.
  99. Short and sweet over long and bitter.
  100. If you must express yourself to feel alive, you must keep on writing.

I do realize that writing tips number 22 and number 80 are almost exactly the same so here is an additional tip to make up for my mistake:

  • When you make a mistake, own up to it. 

Fitting, isn’t it? You may be wondering if I did that on purpose. Well, I didn’t. It was a complete accident. Sorry about my previous error in judgement.

Links to similar posts:

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 2)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 3)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 4)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 5)

Until next time everyone! (Next time being about 100 or so days from now.)

Writing

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 6)

A long overdue post on tips and tricks about writing (well, mostly).

Once again, I post these on my Facebook and Twitter as well.

Enjoy and have an awesome day.

  1. All wonderful things take time to cultivate. Novels are no exceptions.
  2. Be proud of what you write.
  3. Shock your readers. Scare them. Make them cry. Anything. Make them feel something.
  4. Writers must learn to forgive themselves.
  5. Open your heart. Open your mind. Let everything into your life.
  6. Give the readers a reason to read on.
  7. Everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Don’t let a negative opinion bring you down.
  8. Every writer started somewhere. Find your start, know your finish, and work hard from beginning to end.
  9. Leave your readers wanting more, not less.
  10. Filter everything. Filer information, voices, and opinions. Keep what’s useful and discard what isn’t.
  11. If you continue to work, you will eventually succeed.
  12. No piece of writing should contain unnecessary words or sentences.
  13. You can fix your first draft later.
  14. In the writing world, you need compliments as much as you need criticism.
  15. You are a writer, not a miracle worker.
  16. As confusing as grammar is, it’s even more confusing when you don’t employ proper grammar in your work.
  17. Something is better than nothing.
  18. Never fear making mistakes. Your fear will only hinder your creativity.
  19. Write to please yourself but to satisfy your readers.
  20. Make every paragraph meaningful. Make every sentence matter. Make every word magnificent.
  21. When you write, you spew. When you edit, you craft.
  22. Persist and you shall succeed.
  23. Failure is preparation for success.
  24. Anyone can write but not everyone can do it well.
  25. Never underestimate the intelligence of your audience.

Links to previous posts:

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 2)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 3)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 4)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 5)

Feel free to comment down below and tell me which one resonated with you the most.

Writing

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 5)

Sorry for the delay.

Part five of my 25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, And Authors experienced some technical issues but now everything is fine and fixed.

As always, these tips are posted on my Facebook and Twitter.

  1. When you focus too much on yourself, you miss out on valuable opportunities around you.
  2. You don’t read anything? You can’t write anything. You read everything? You can write everything.
  3. Know where you are going before you get there.
  4. Get the words on the page first. That’s your top priority.
  5. The most painless way to become a better writer: read.
  6. Emulate the best but don’t ever copy.
  7. You learn the most through finishing things. Finish your stories, your poems, your novels.
  8. Write with an audience of one in mind.
  9. Unused ideas and notes don’t have to go to waste. They may serve a purpose later on.
  10. Words don’t magically appear on the page—you have to put them there.
  11. Never write to please.
  12. Write like no one is watching.
  13. Don’t be scared to ask for help, especially when first starting out.
  14. I write because it is the only thing I know how to do.
  15. Writing is a passion filled with agony.
  16. You will learn a great deal through the act of finishing more so than only starting.
  17. Don’t try to please everyone. The minute you do is the minute you’ll fail.
  18. Find editors you trust. You can’t always trust what you write on the page makes sense.
  19. If you don’t have a specific reason why it is there, leave it out.
  20. Common sense and the writing mind are not friends. Imagination is.
  21. I think more when I am writing than when I am reading yet I learn the most when I read.
  22. I can’t stress the importance of titles and headlines enough. Always invest time into them.
  23. The backstory should be in the back, not front and center.
  24. Embrace all forms of criticism. Learn to grow from your mistakes.
  25. Remember: you are a writer. Your muse lurks in your subconscious.

Links to previous posts:

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 2)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 3)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 4)

The most recent post:

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 6)

Writing

September Is Nearly Over, October Is About To Begin, And November Is Not Far Ahead

I’ve come to the realization that September is almost over. This beautiful moment of revelation gives me a tiny heart attack. October, second to November, is one heck of a busy month for writers who wish to participate in NaNoWriMo. You know that planning, outlining, researching phase that seems to be a waste of time but makes your life a whole lot easier down the road? Then again, maybe you’re one of those writers who like to wait until November before working on your novel. Regardless of what kind of writer you are, whether you let your characters do whatever they want or you know every detail of every character beforehand because you’re that meticulous, October is a crucial month all the same.

In past years, I never saw the importance of October, therefore; November became somewhat of a nightmare. I would wait until the first day of November before I plunged into the sometimes deadly sea of novel writing among other endeavors I could have taken care of in the weeks prior had I used the gray matter between my ears. Thinking about an idea is one thing. Crafting an idea one can actually write about is another.

Let us all learn from the inexperienced Herminia Chow. Use October wisely. Make the best use of your time. Clean the house until no speck of dust is in sight, organize your desk by shuffling all your papers around, buy a month’s supply of coffee and chocolate, anything. So that come November your butt will be in the chair—writing the next best-seller.

Writing

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 4)

25 writing tips complied together from my  Facebook and Twitter.

  1. Make up rules as you go. But don’t make them too rigid that you can’t break them if need be.
  2. The perfect novel should reflect who you are and who you want to become.
  3. Don’t suppress your most painful memories. Relive them.
  4. Write about everything that has ever affected you in a way that will affect somebody else.
  5. When it comes to writing, ignorance is not bliss. The more you know, the better you can become.
  6. Exaggerate everything. Only then will your story be interesting.
  7. Chase your dreams. You’ll never know where they’ll lead you if you don’t.
  8. If you write consistently, you’re a writer. It’s as simple as that.
  9. Never use too many words. It’s just as bad as not using enough words to get your point across.
  10. Forget bliss. Writing is one part pain and two parts frustration.
  11. Grammar isn’t a set of rules made to inflict torture. Grammar was made to simplify the English language.
  12. If you are not easily distracted, you already have an advantage over most writers.
  13. Writers and readers are sadists. Writers inflict pain on characters. Readers enjoy the agony.
  14. Write as much as you can, whenever you are able to. But try to write when you are most productive.
  15. Relying on spell check leads to doom.
  16. Having a strong ending is as important as having a strong beginning.
  17. Writers: you aren’t not paid by the word. So stop using unnecessary words.
  18. Omit until every word serves a purpose.
  19. Choose a style you like, and stick to it.
  20. If you care about your credibility, avoid distracting your readers.
  21. Give yourself permission to suck. Accept it.
  22. Creativity must be demonstrated not stated.
  23. Develop an attitude of deep skepticism about every word you write or say.
  24. Write through feelings of fear and doubt.
  25. People telling you that you aren’t good enough will keep you hungry.

Click on any of the links below for more writing tips:

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 2)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 3)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 5)

25 Writing Tips For Writers, Editors, and Authors (Part 6)