From One Blogger To Another

I have some thoughts about blogging that I want to share.

After being on WordPress for over four years, I’ve come to realize a few things.

I procrastinate writing. I put off editing. It’s not a good combination when trying to publish a post every day. Technically, every night.

I’m hard on myself. So hard.

I hope you aren’t as hard on yourself.

I want a post to be perfect or as close to perfect as possible, which makes me avoid doing the work. But by doing so I give myself less time to write and edit the post.

In short, I’m a bad blogger. But you already knew that.

Write. Edit. Publish. Don’t procrastinate. Don’t put off. Don’t be like me.

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Staying True To Yourself

I used to be someone I wasn’t. I wasn’t myself because I tried to be what people wanted or expected of me.

I’m not perfect by any stretch. I still struggle to stay true to what I stand for. But it’s easy to give in.

At times, I feel very much like I’m a doormat. Because I let people step on me figuratively. I don’t put my foot down.

I can be firm, say no. I tend to know what I want to do, what I don’t want to do. But I’ve never been the best at vocalizing my desires or opinions, especially if they’re unpopular, which they often are.

When I first sat down to write this post, I figured I’d write about my journey as a blogger. How at one point in time I was not blogging for myself. And because of that, I didn’t feel happy. Or content with my creations.

But recently I realized I’m not always myself around people in general. Maybe that means I need new company. Or maybe I have to rethink who I am as well as who I want to be.

For better or worse, people change. Differently. Some people change faster while others take a bit longer.

Now more than ever before I’ve come to accept and embrace my flaws, quirks, etc. But I can love myself yet still want to improve, get better. That’s life for you.

Humans are not easily content. At least, I’m not. If I was completely happy, I wouldn’t have to do anything ever again. I wouldn’t learn every day. Or read, write, blog.

As I grow older, I hope to mature and become the person I aspire to be. Not always easy, but I’m doing my best. That’s all I ask of myself.

Stay true to yourself. Don’t live your life for someone else.

How Being A Blogger Made Me A Better Writer

I don’t know many things, but I know that blogging has improved my writing. So I figured after four years of managing this blog, I should write a post explaining how being a blogger made me a better writer. And continues to. Let’s see where this goes.

Brevity

Before blogging, I used to be somewhat lengthy and wordy at times. But I’ve cut down on that. Get my point across. Use as many words as I need to. No more, no less.

Grammar

I try to use good grammar all the time. Blogging isn’t an exception. I’ve also run into instances where I’m unsure of a grammatical rule while I’m writing a blog post and had to look it up. It never hurts to have greater exposure to grammar.

Style

Everyone has their own style, even though it takes plenty of time to develop.

Voice

Being on WordPress allowed me to discover myself on many fronts. And because I aim to blog every day, I have had a lot of chances to figure out who I am.

How has blogging helped you as a writer?

Being A Bad Blogger Again?

I have said I’m a bad blogger on many occasions. I’m not sure how many. I don’t keep track of all the truths I tell. But as this school year kicks into high gear, I feel the need to claim my bad blogger status again.

To be fair, you can blame my time management, well, lack thereof, for my shortcomings as a member of this lovely community. Still, I will do my absolute best to be my best.

Creating my own original content will always be a priority to me. I appreciate all of you who respect that.

I struggle, some days more than others with writing, editing, etc. I certainly don’t know everything there is to know. With each and every day, I’m learning. I am a student. I will always be one.

I’m well aware blogging is a two-way street. You give and take. You reciprocate. I’m not the best at reciprocating. If I’m being completely honest, I’ve probably gotten worse at giving back.

So with that being said, I want to take the time to thank all of you.

When I first started this blog four years ago in 2013, I never thought I’d still be blogging in 2017. Like with most things I figured I’d get bored and drop blogging like a hot potato. But I haven’t. Part of the reason why I haven’t is because of you.

To all the people who read my posts back when I had no idea what I was doing, not that I have any idea now, thanks for giving a new blogger a chance. Thank you to those who showed me the ropes and then allowed me to grasp them on my own. To everyone who reads and comments, I wish you knew how much it means to me. Your support, your encouragement kept me going even during the darkest winter nights when I thought about giving up.

I can’t make any promises or guarantees, but I can do better. And I will. Not just for me but for all of you who have stuck around.

28 Boring Words And What To Use Instead

Another writer and blogger named Jack Milgram shared this lovely infographic with me the other day. So I thought I’d share it with all of you because sharing is caring. I obviously like to think I’m a caring person. Then again, there’s probably a reason why I don’t have many friends in real life and turn to fictional characters to keep me company. On a more serious note, I hope this graphic helps!

Why I Blog

Some people blog for the wrong reasons. I like to think I’m blogging for the right reasons.

It’s not about the numbers. It shouldn’t be. But having followers is nice. Reading comments is fun.

When I first started my blog in 2013, I got so much joy out of writing. Creating. Making something from nothing.

For a time, I stopped enjoying the creative process as much as I once did because I was focused on the wrong things. But the bliss I felt when I first started blogging keeps me going. So I’ll keep trying to have fun as I write and edit.

Everything else is secondary to me. The views, the followers. Fame. Fortune.

I didn’t start this blog with the goal of turning it into a business. In many ways, I initially wanted blogging to remain a hobby, a passion. At least I want to blog for myself. Writing blog posts for others is a different story.

I hope I never forget the happiness I felt when I began in high school. How excited I was at the end of the day while brushing my teeth.

Four years ago, I made a decision to start a blog. And almost every day I’ve decided to stick with it. I want to see where this journey will take me. I’ve already seen and done more than I ever expected to back in April of 2013.

I don’t regret starting a blog. It’s one of the best things I’ve done in my twenty years of living.

I’ll continue to do my best to not regret, to live my life without regrets.

I haven’t always been where I am today. I went many years without a blog. But now it’s such a big part of my life. I don’t know what I’d do if I didn’t or couldn’t blog.

I have no idea what to expect from this coming school year. But I have a feeling blogging will be a constant. This blog has been a rock for me. It’s been a lighthouse. Everything I asked for and more.

Whatever happens, wherever I go, I’ll likely write a blog post about it.

What else would I do? Take a picture and post it on social media? Please. That’s just not me.

20 Goals As A 20 Year Old

I’ve come up with 20 goals for my 20 year old self.

  1. Worry less.
  2. Have fun.
  3. Put my happiness first.
  4. Ask for help.
  5. Think for myself.
  6. Say yes when I should.
  7. Say no when I shouldn’t.
  8. Move on.
  9. Write more.
  10. Be a better blogger.
  11. Learn from mistakes.
  12. Celebrate the small victories.
  13. Dance like someone is watching.
  14. Look after my health.
  15. Smile at strangers.
  16. Love a lot.
  17. Laugh out loud.
  18. Be mindful.
  19. Enjoy the present.
  20. Live life.

I know a lot of these are commonly used phrases, but I’m a walking cliché.

20 Lessons I Learned As A Blogger


I'm nearly twenty years on this earth, and I've been blogging for over four.

So you're telling me I'm old and not afraid of commitment?

I don't believe it.

But I do believe being a blogger has taught me some valuable things.

  1. Love words, not numbers.
  2. Give back to the community.
  3. Always be yourself.
  4. Never stop learning.
  5. Do your best.
  6. Don't forget why you started.
  7. Create greatness.
  8. Keep it simple.
  9. Practice as often as possible.
  10. Push your perceived limits.
  11. Be your own boss.
  12. Listen to those who matter.
  13. Ignore the noise.
  14. Keep improving.
  15. Ask for help.
  16. Stay humble.
  17. Rise to the challenge.
  18. Chase what you want.
  19. Live life.
  20. Put your happiness first.

What have you learned from running a blog? I'd love to know down below. After all, sharing is caring.

How Being A Blogger Is Like Being A Baseball Player

The other day I had a brilliant idea wherein I change my brand to blogging about blogging using baseball analogies and similes.

I'm joking about the brilliant idea. I'm not joking about the baseball part. Which is why I'm presenting you with this probably bad, definitely weird post about what bloggers and baseball players have in common.

Long hours.

Weekends and holidays, what are those? These don't exist when you're a pro baseball player, and they certainly don't exist for bored teenagers who decided to start a blog with the goal of publishing one post once per day.

Thick skin.

Otherwise, you'll break like a breaking ball. Get it? Because breaking balls break. I'm so helpful. I know. My friends tell me that all the time.

Constantly thinking.

About blogging or baseball even when you aren't blogging or baseballing. Allow me to butcher words as I please.

Continually failing.

If you get a hit three out of the ten times you come to the plate, you're considered an above average hitter. So it's okay to fail more than you succeed. Now if only I could publish one half decent post for every hundred that I write. Then a certain girl might be able to blog about baseball for a living.

Messing up.

Even professional baseball players make errors. News flash: they're human beings too. Last I checked, so are bloggers. Everybody and their moms screw up, but there's no need to beat yourself up over a minor mistake.

Hard work.

They say baseball is a mental game. People have said that, right? I can't afford to pay anyone to fact-check my content. And I'm too lazy to do it myself. Blogging is very much a mental game, if not even more so than any sport. After all, bloggers don't actually have to move anything but their fingers.

I probably struck out on with this post. Next time I'll write a hit.

Why I Have A Hard Time Sharing My Creative Writing

Sharing my creative writing with others is a challenge to say the least.

The other day I was trying to pick a story to send to two strangers for their feedback. I had the hardest time emailing a copy of my work to them.

There's something personal about openly sharing your stories with someone else. To an extent, some of my blog posts are personal, and I don't have a problem posting those for the world to see. With creative writing however, I feel as though I'm exposing more of myself.

As I've said, these two are strangers. I think I'd be more comfortable with sharing if I knew them longer, trusted them more. I'm sure they're wonderful human beings. It's still tough to open up and feel vulnerable in front of people you hardly know.

If I had a penny for every times I've said I wanted to get better, I'd be one wealthy woman. Even though I do hope to improve, I'm not the best at asking for feedback. Ditto for applying any feedback I receive.

I'm stubborn. Worse, I have a gigantic ego that loves to get in the way. On a good day, I'm able to shove it aside for the sake of my art.

Every time I've put my art first before my ego, the former benefits greatly.

I say the following not to brag, but to make it clear that I had a different, unusual path when I started out as a writer and blogger. I found success early on in both endeavours. In some ways, I was even more successful a few years ago than I have been recently.

So, for many reasons, my ego was inflated in high school. A part of me thought I always knew what was best, what was right.

Of course, that's not always the case.

Over time, my ego has taken a good beating.

I'm at a point now where I feel confident, not cocky in my abilities. After all, I've come a long way, but I still have plenty of room for improvement.

I can identify strengths and weaknesses in my own work. But having an outside perspective point out certain problems can make all the difference.

What I want to say ultimately boils down to these points:

Sharing your writing with strangers isn't easy. It can be a vulnerable experience. That's okay, though. So long as you don't let your ego stop you from improving your art in every way possible. And sometimes the best thing you can do is to put your ego aside and listen to others.

I think I've reaffirmed what I knew all along. Egos suck.