Writing

How To Stay Positive As A Writer

It’s not easy staying positive as a writer, especially when the world keeps rejecting your work.

But positivity is a beautiful thing. Here’s to keeping your optimism alive and well.

  • Celebrate small wins. You came up with an idea? You wrote one sentence? You edited a paragraph? Celebrate that. It’s easy to overlook all the little things in life. You may feel like you aren’t making progress, but if you’re putting in the work every day, life will fall into place. Besides, small wins add up to big victories over time.
  • Look back. Remember all you’ve achieved.
  • Look forward. Think about the things you can accomplish.
  • Treat yourself. You deserve it. Play. How fun. Do other activities.
  • Be aware of your thoughts and feelings. Humans tend to focus on the negatives. Say positive affirmations. Whatever they may be.
  • Filter out the noise. There’s a lot of sounds or voices around at any given time. You don’t have to listen to all of it.
  • Use social media in moderation. Spending all day on Facebook isn’t that productive and probably won’t leave you feeling too proud.
  • Exercise often. Endorphins are a wonderful thing.
  • Choose what you read carefully. Reading is amazing. But the media you consume can have an impact on your own emotions.
  • Go for a walk outside. Soak up the sun’s rays. Vitamin D is good for your health.
  • Write for yourself. Create what you want. Tell the stories you need to tell. You’re different and unique. You aren’t anyone else, so don’t pretend to be someone you’re not.
Advertisements
Writing

The Ultimate Guide To Writing A Novel

Whether it’s your first time or your tenth, here are some things to keep in mind as you write that novel.

This isn’t an ultimate guide by any means. Just some bad advice from an aspiring writer.

  • Take it word by word. Don’t worry about the 10,000th word or the 100,000th word. Think about the next one.
  • Edit later. Writing is hard enough as it is. Stop making the creative process harder for yourself. Besides, you can always fix your mistakes later.
  • Use good tools. If you prefer pen and paper, pick something that writes well. If you prefer typing, choose the word processor you like best. You don’t have to break the bank, but your tool needs to do its job.
  • Write the scene you want. Feel free to jump around from the beginning to the ending to the middle.
  • Enjoy yourself. Play your favourite songs. Have a drink nearby. Grab a snack or ten.
  • Live a little. Actually, live a lot. Go outside. Experience the world so you’re able to tell rich stories. You can’t shut yourself inside all day and night.
  • Have good posture. Your future self will thank you.
  • Keep your mind open. Don’t shoot down your ideas right away. Sometimes the craziest idea turns out better than you could ever imagine.
  • Challenge yourself. You’re capable of accomplishing far more than you give yourself credit for.
Writing

Advice On Starting A First Draft

Outline

Sketch a timeline of events that will happen. Brainstorm scenes using sticky notes and move them accordingly. Create character sketches beforehand, so you have a better understanding of key players in your novel.

Research

Reading articles, essays, or books might inspire you to write your own. Besides, Google is your best friend.

Write

At some point, that first draft needs to be written. Unfortunately, it won’t write itself. So pick up a pen or open your word processor of choice. Grab an idea and run with it.

Relax

Take a deep breath. You don’t have to get it right the first time. Try to silence your inner editor for now. You can always make a draft better, but you can’t if it doesn’t exist yet.

Writing

What It’s Like To Write A Novel

  • Getting hit by an idea, comparable to getting hit by lightning but 10 times better.
  • Trying to remember said idea because it’s going to make you rich and famous. Hello, New York Times bestseller and blockbuster movie deal with Hollywood.
  • Finding someplace to write down your story idea. A napkin works.
  • Beginning on a high note. Make sure you cherish the honeymoon phase. It doesn’t last long enough.
  • Reaching the halfway point and realizing you still have a long way to go. Don’t quit now. What a shame to let your hard work go to waste.
  • Coming to terms with the fact that your first draft sucks. Happens to the best of us.
  • Wanting to abandon your novel because another idea came along. Perhaps the grass is greener on the other side.
  • Seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. You’re almost done.
  • Writing the last sentence. The two best words you’ll ever type: THE END.
  • Wishing you could sleep for the next 10 years. You can’t. Sorry.
  • Dreading the thought of having to edit your manuscript at some point. You got this.
  • Patting yourself on the back. Go eat a cake or two. You deserve it.
Productivity

I Need To Stop Procrastinating Right Now

In a perfect world, I wouldn’t procrastinate. But I live in an imperfect world and I’m an imperfect human being.

I delay. I put things off. And when the deadline nears, my stress levels skyrocket.

Even though I’m someone who hates leaving things to the last minute, I don’t always start early enough.

At least when I procrastinate, I try to be somewhat productive. Instead of doing the thing I should, I’ll do something else like clean. It’s not as urgent as an essay due in three days, but I’ll still take cleaning over writing. Or editing. Don’t even get me started on edits.

I find it interesting how much better I’ve gotten at procrastinating over the years. I guess I’ve had a lot of practice. For some reason, I didn’t put things off as much in high school. Then I went to university and everything changed.

I procrastinate with blogging all the time. I can’t help it.

When I was younger, I used to be more of a morning person, so I procrastinated less.

Nowadays, I stay up later and do most of my creative writing later in the day, which means I procrastinate until I can’t.

Blogging · Writing

My Blog Post Writing Process

My blog post writing process has changed a lot over the years. As of right now, I have a routine That works well enough for me.

Writing

I handwrite most of my posts with a pen and a notepad. I tend to talk about whatever’s on my mind, so I don’t really need to research beforehand.

Transcribing

Next, I transcribe my hand written posts. I used to type them up word for word, but now I use the voice dictation feature on my phone.

Editing

Finally, I edit a post until I’m happy with it. Of course, nothing is ever perfect. But I try to aim for clarity. I also like being concise, so I tend to delete a lot. Time is valuable, which is why I’d hate to waste mine. More importantly, I would hate to waste yours.

I don’t say this often enough, but I truly appreciate each and everyone of you who stops by my blog. Thanks for reading!

Writing

Tell The Story You’re Afraid To Tell

As a human being who is terrified of many things, I often use writing to deal with some of my fears. Obviously, that’s not the same as confronting them, but it’s a start.

That being said, I’ve been too scared to write about things I should. Or I’ll beat around the bush and skirt around the issue.

I don’t always write how I really feel.

So hopefully, I’ll listen to my own advice about telling the story I’m afraid to tell. I need to share it, if not with the world then at least with myself.

Perhaps I should do the same on this blog. There are many posts I haven’t written or published because of fear.

Then again, the posts I do manage to write turn out to be some of the best.

I can’t make any specific promises because I break everything, but I can make an effort to overcome my fear. Both on the page and in real life. I encourage all of you to do the same.

It won’t be easy. In fact, that’s hard work. But I like to believe the story you’re scared to death of sharing needs to be told.

I don’t want to live in fear, and I especially don’t want to write in fear.

To be honest, I’ve been holding back. I know I can do better. So what if I fail? So what if I make mistakes? I can learn. I will grow.

I censor, I filter. Sometimes I avoid writing what I think because I worry about what others will think.

But I don’t write for others. I write for myself. I have an audience of one. That girl is hard enough to please on a good day.

I don’t want to make my life even harder because I’m afraid to write. I won’t let fear get the best of me.

Editing

How To Silence Your Inner Editor

There are times you need to write, which means you somehow have to silence your inner editor. Unfortunately, that’s a lot easier said than done.

Below is all my bad advice on how to silence him or her.

Tell your editor to shut up. Put your foot down.

Ask nicely. If being mean doesn’t work, try being polite?

Don’t do anything. Sometimes not forcing the issue is the best thing you can do.

Embrace the obnoxious editor. Befriend him or her.

Ignore. Hopefully they can take a hint. Or at least learn to.

Blast music. Turn the volume up. Careful you don’t shatter your ear drums in the process.

Listen. Maybe your head is trying to tell you something. After you hear yourself out, maybe your inner editor will finally stop bothering you. One can hope.

Lock them in a cage and throw the key away. Or just imagine doing so.

Practice. Just keep writing.

Never write another word in your life. Non-writers don’t have to deal with annoying inner editors, right? It doesn’t seem like such a bad life.